Important Update

The School of Theology has decided to conduct the Advanced Degrees Program online for this session only. Should you decide to take this summer away from the program, or to take a reduced load, then you will be given an extra year to complete your degree.

Classes will begin on Monday, June 8, and run through Thursday, June 25, meeting using Zoom for two hours every weekday. There will be no orientation on the first Monday (June 8) so classes will begin on that day. 

The four classes being offered this session will meet in Central Time each day:

  • 8–9:50 a.m.— PREACHING PHILIPPIANS (David Stark and Paul Holloway)
  • 10–11:50 a.m.— RACE, THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH, AND THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH: FROM SLAVERY TO CIVIL RIGHTS (Ben King, Jody Allen and Woody Register)
  • 1–2:50 a.m.— BAPTISM AND CONFIRMATION: PATTERNS AND PRACTICES (James Turrell)
  • 3–4:50 a.m.—PANDEMIC CHRISTIANITY (Lauren Winner)

When registration opens on April 17, you are invited to register for two classes as usual. But, in this very unusual year, you may want to register for only one class. All students taking a reduced load will be given an extra year to complete their degree. For those of you who are in your third or fourth year of classes, you may choose instead to register for one class and one unit of project/thesis writing. (Note: if you haven't yet written your proposal in consultation with your advisor, or haven't had the proposal approved by the ADP committee, then you will need to do so by May 15 in order to register to do project/thesis writing in June.) If you wanted to avoid classes altogether, then those of you with a proposal approved may also register for both units of project/thesis writing.

This year's applications for financial aid are due on May 1. The deadline for registration is May 15.

June 8–27, 2020

Baptism and Confirmation: Patterns and Practices

Anthropologists tell us that rites of initiation provide a window into the core beliefs and symbols of a culture. This course will examine the history, theology, and present practice of Christian baptism, as well as its derivative, confirmation. By considering the development of these rites, we will point towards ways to renew the practice of baptism and confirmation in the Episcopal Church and other denominations. While either course may be taken on its own, students will benefit most from taking both this course and the summer 2021 course on the Catechumenate, which will cover models and practices of preparation for Christian initiation.

PREACHING PHILIPPIANS

This course examines the intersections of biblical interpretation and homiletical practice as it relates to the book of Philippians. It engages in a close reading of the text within its historical context, considers the impact of lectio continua on preaching, reflects on ways Philippians might inform preaching from Pauline epistles, and offers opportunities to study and practice preaching from Philippians.

RACE, THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH, AND THE UNIVERSITY OF THE SOUTH: FROM SLAVERY TO CIVIL RIGHTS.

The diocese and parishes of the Episcopal Church are currently taking an unflinching look at their historic entanglements with slavery and slavery’s legacies. So is the University of the South, the university owned by the Episcopal Church’s southern dioceses and that shares their fraught history on matters of race and the institution of bondage that produced the ideology of racial injustice in this hemisphere. This course draws upon the expertise of those who work in the Roberson Project on Slavery, Race, and Reconciliation at the University of the South to examine the period from the civil war to civil rights in order to ponder how a more truthful understanding of its history may foster a more just future inside and outside The Episcopal Church.

Pandemic Christianty

What might Christianity in an era of pandemic look like? In this class, we will consider inter alia: the articulation of Scripture with the social context of pandemic; parish practice during pandemic; various doctrinal loci (eg hamartiology, ecclesiology) in the midst of pandemic; preaching during pandemic; articulation of the Church year to pandemic; and the Church in earlier eras of pandemic.

Advanced Degrees Program