2018 Course Descriptions

LAUREN WINNER, DUKE DIVINITY SCHOOL: "IMAGES OF GOD IN THE BIBLE"

This course will introduce students to the Bible’s figurative language for God. The aims are to expand our imagination about who God is (and who we, as bearers of God’s image, and friends and disciples of God). We will ask: How do people’s images of God—and their resulting images of themselves (sheep? vassals?)—invite them to become (or interfere with their becoming) the people God means us to be? How do images of God help readers of the Bible greet one another as bearers of the image of God? How do we pray to the God who is clothing or fire? Or dog? How does the God who is clothing or fire pray in us? We will also pursue the re-enchantment of the world—that is, we will ask not only how it changes our understanding of God to realize that God is figured in the Bible as clothing; we’ll also ask how it changes our understanding of clothing (and trees, and bread) to receive them as created objects that carry clues about who God is. Our course will pursue those questions by articulating biblical texts, non-Scriptural readings about the things that Scripture treats as figures for God, and the archives of our own lives. 

The following is the reading to be completed before the first class session. Other reading will be assigned during the course as indicated by the syllabus, which will be made available before the course starts: You will need to read the material assigned for the first day as close to the start of the summer term as is feasible for you.

  • Margaret Moers Wenig, “God Is a Woman and She’s Growing Older” (1990 sermon online)
  • Jamie D. Aten, et al., “God Images Following Hurricane Katrina in South Mississippi”, Journal of Psychology and Theology vol. 36/4 (2008).
  • Winner, Wearing God, Introduction, Note on Gender, and Chapter 2
  • Recommended: Froese and Bader, America’s Four Gods, 13-64

 

JAMES TENGATENGA, SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY, AND ROBERT MACSWAIN, SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY: "SAME-SEX RELATIONSHIPS AND THE ANGLICAN COMMUNION" 

Same-sex relationships replaced the ordination of women as the most divisive issue in the Anglican Communion at Lambeth 1998 and then became the instigating crisis of The Windsor Report (2004). While this issue raises multiple disciplinary questions (biblical interpretation; doctrinal, liturgical, and sacramental theology; law; science; medicine; psychology; etc.), it is often perceived primarily as an ethical matter. Given that the entire worldwide Anglican Communion is debating the issue, despite our shared tradition it thus also raises questions of moral disagreement across vast and potentially irreconcilable cultural differences. This course will look at this issue primarily through an ethical and theological lens, paying particular attention to its context in various provinces of the Anglican Communion, especially in The Episcopal Church (USA)

The following is the reading to be completed before the first class session:

  • Jesse Zink, Backpacking Through the Anglican Communion (Morehouse, 2014).
  •  Timothy F. Sedgwick, Sex, Moral Teaching, and the Unity of the Church: A Study of the Episcopal Church (Morehouse Publishing, 2014).
  • Suggested to read in advance: Philip Groves (ed.), The Anglican Communion and Homosexuality (SPCK, 2008).

 

BENJAMIN J. KING, SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY: “THE OXFORD MOVEMENT, THE LITURGY”

This course will chart the history of the Oxford Movement and its impact on the liturgy and the religious and social beliefs of the Church of England primarily, but also on the wider Anglican Communion. The Movement did not exist in a vacuum, so we will see its interaction with English society as well as with other Anglicans. Finally, we will examine the successors of the Oxford Movement into the 20th century: slum priests, the Liberal Catholics, the liturgical renewal, the parish communion movement.

The following is the reading to be completed before the first class session. Other reading will be assigned during the course as indicated by the syllabus, which will be made available before the course starts: You will need to read the material assigned for the first day as close to the start of the summer term as is feasible for you.

  • Owen Chadwick, Newman: A Short Introduction (Oxford)
  • Peter B. Nockles, The Oxford Movement in Context: Anglican High Churchmanship, 1760-1857 (Cambridge), esp. Chapters 3-5.

 

THOMAS LONG, CANDLER SCOOL OF THEOLOGY, AND WILLIAM BROSEND, SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY: PARABLES AND PREACHING

Parables and Preaching will explore the current state of parable interpretation, consider models for preaching the parables, and tease out the implications of parable interpretation and proclamation for preaching more broadly. Students will preach in class for evaluation, and submit additional written material by Sept. 1.

Preliminary reading list:

  • Brosend, Conversation with Scripture: the Parables and The Homiletical Question
  • Donahue, The Gospel in Parables
  • Levine, Short Stories by Jesus
  • Lischer, Reading the Parables

 

NEIL ALEXANDER, SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY, AND JAMES TURRELL, SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY: "MAPPING LITURGICAL STRUCTURES"

A seminar on the ritual patterns of Christian Initiation and the Holy Eucharist with attention to the evolution and theology of effective pastoral practice for the church today. Readings emphasize current pastoral practice against the background of grounded liturgical theology.

Required Reading:

  • Colin Buchanan, ed., Anglican Eucharistic Liturgies, 1985-2010
  • Maxwell Johnson, The Rites of Christian Initiation: Their Evolution and Interpretation rev. edn.
  • Paul Bradshaw and Maxwell Johnson, The Eucharistic Liturgies: Their Evolution and Interpretation
  • Patrick Malloy, Celebrating the Eucharist
  • James F. Turrell, Celebrating the Rites of Initiation
  • E.C. Whitaker and Maxwell E. Johnson, eds., Documents of the Baptismal Liturgy revised edn. (Collegeville, Minn., 2003), p. 4-8, 36-40, 284-307
  • - Apostolic Tradition ascribed to Hippolytus
  • - Apostolic Constitutions, VII
  • - Sarum Rite (blessing of font, baptism, confirmation)
  • 1549 Book of Common Prayer, rites of baptism and confirmation
  • 1552 Book of Common Prayer, rites of baptism and confirmation
  • Book of Common Prayer (1979), p. 298-314, 412-419; Book of Occasional Services 2003, p. 114-145.
  • Sacrosanctum Concilium (“Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy”)
  • Louis Weil, Liturgical Sense
  • Robert F. Taft, Beyond East and West: Problems in Liturgical Understanding (Rome, 1997), chapter 10 “The Structural Analysis of Liturgical Units: An Essay in Methodology”
  • Suggested supplemental reading: Odo Casel, The Mystery of Christian Worship