The School of Theology. Sewanee: The University of the South

Electives

ANGL 537 C. S. Lewis: Author, Apologist, and Anglican

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This course will examine selected writings of C. S. Lewis (1898-1963) with special attention to the Anglican character of his work. It will begin with Lewis's philosophical arguments against naturalism (including consideration of Elizabeth Anscombe's critique), and then consider his thought on the Trinity, Incarnation, ethics, gender, war, eschatology, and the spiritual life. It will conclude with analysis his last two works of fiction, The Last Battle (for children) and Till We Have Faces (for adults), both published in 1956.

ANGL 539 The Anglican Tradition of Reason: Butler, Newman, and Farrer

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This course will examine the theological and philosophical aspects of an important tradition spanning three centuries of English Anglicanism. Focusing on the writings of three definitive figures who drew upon and shaped this tradition, we will examine Joseph Butler in the eighteenth century, John Henry Newman in the nineteenth century, and Austin Farrer in the twentieth century. All three were noted preachers and scholars, as well as original thinkers and devout churchmen; the works we read will represent these different modes and concerns of their writing. We will also examine the historical context in both church and society during their respective periods, and consider the significance and implications of this “tradition of reason” for Anglican theology today

CHHT 501 Episcopal Church History

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This is a study of the Episcopal Church in the United States from 1607 until the present. It will focus on both the theology and history of the Episcopal Church. The course will stress understanding that which is distinctive about the Episcopal Church.

CHHT 540 Classic Texts of the English Reformation

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The English Reformation of the sixteenth century generated authoritative printed documents that came to have continuing authority or influence among later Anglicans, documents such as the “Thirty-Nine Articles” and “The Book of Common Prayer.” This course will study several of those documents closely in their historical context. It will not analyze the English Reformation as a social and political process of religious change, but rather to consider the foundational statements of English Protestantism, which have had (at least nominal) continuing authority among Anglicans.

CHHT 551 Anglican History from the Reformation to the Windsor Report

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Beginning with the Reformation, this course traces the origins and the development of Anglicanism.  Focusing on the Church of England, it will consider the events and ideas that shaped Anglicanism, especially the Reformers, the Deists, the Evangelical revival, the Oxford Movement and Anglo-Catholicism, the Social Gospel and the Anglican Communion.

LTCM 536/HIST 370 Ritual and Worship in the Long English Reformation

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This course examines the role of ritual and worship in the religious history of England, ca. 1530 to ca. 1700. It studies the transformation of a traditional religion based on rituals into a religious system based as much on word as on rite. The course draws connections between these religious changes and the larger political, social, and cultural contexts in which they occurred. Students engage in weekly readings and discussion and prepare a research paper.

THEO 553 The Glass of Vision: Scripture, Metaphysics, and Poetry (also ANGL)

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This course will examine one of the most significant texts of 20th century Anglican theology: Austin Farrer’s Bampton Lectures delivered in Oxford in 1948 and published as The Glass of Vision. According to Farrer, the general topic of the lectures is “the form of divine truth in the human mind,” explored through engagements with three areas of inquiry: scripture, metaphysics, and poetry. Specific issues considered are the relationship between faith and reason, the nature of biblical inspiration and divine revelation, the character of human imagination, and the literary analysis of New Testament texts. We will also consider Farrer’s critics and defenders, such as Helen Gardner, Frank Kermode, David Jasper, and David Brown. Limited to M.Div. seniors, second year M.A. students who have already taken Systematic Theology I, and S.T.M. students.