The School of Theology. Sewanee: The University of the South

News From the Field

Clergy Mentor Meeting Feb. 19, 2014

Please join us at 8:50 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2014, for a day of focus to growing your strengths in ministry as a mentor with seminarians in field education. You may see the agenda here.

We will be distributing iPad minis to those clergy mentors without iPads or tablet and who are currently partnered with a student. If you have an Apple ID and password, please bring it so we can set it up for you. If you currenly own an iPad or tablet, please bring that with you to the meeting.

In the morning, you’ll be with our current group of students along with Gallup’s StrengthsFinder Coach, Kim Heitzenrater, director of career and leadership development at the University of the South. 

In the afternoon, you’ll hear from the founder of the Clergy Leadership Institute, the Rev. Dr. Rob Voyle.

Gallup, Inc.’s more than 75 years of experience that reaches across the world has focused on the science of strengths to help millions of people discover what they do best. They are now turning that expertise in our direction, inspiring faith leaders to transform their communities and change the world!

From the the Rev. Kammy Young, director of contextual education — “Over 20 years ago Linda Grenz led a strategic planning retreat for St. Mark’s in Jacksonville, Fla. and said one simple sentence that changed my life: “What you give attention to grows.” It has becoame a daily mantra and prayer to ask myself what I hope to see grow in a person, a situation, a meeting and then make choices to give that my attention.  The squeaky wheel doesn’t always get the grease anymore.  Working in areas that use my strengths and address my strongest values and interest are usually a better choice than working really hard to become mediocre in areas that are weak for me.”

'Finally, beloved, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence and if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things.'  (Philippians 4.8)

Field Education Partnership Prize

A monthly prize has been established to highlight accomplishments within the field education program. January's recognition goes to those adventurous souls who are willing to pursue their learning goals in formation as priests by traveling to the ends of the earth (at least if you consider Sewanee the center of the universe, as some are wont to do!)

January 2014 prizes are awarded to the following:

  • Richmond Jones, T'15, from the Diocese of Atlanta, learning with the Rev. Hendree Harrison, rector of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Athens, Tenn.
  • Nancee Cekuta, T'15, also from the Diocese of Atlanta, partnered with the Rev. David Dill.
  • Kemper Anderson, T'15, the third from the Diocese of Atlanta, who travels all the way to St. Peter’s in Rome (Georgia, that is) and is mentored by the Rev. John Herring alongside our former dean of community life, the Rev. Nikki Mathis.

We especially honor those students and mentors who are willing to engage powerful Spirit-filled partnerships no matter how far away they may take you!

'But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.’  (Acts 1.8)

Mission Enterprize Zone Grant

The Diocese of Alabama received a grant for a new initiative titled “Be the Change Alabama.” The grant from the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of The Episcopal Church represents a unique partnership among three church organizations: the Diocese of Alabama and its committed parishes; The School of Theology and its students in ministry formation; and the Leadership Development Initiative (LDI) with its solid record of similar work with congregations in the Diocese of Massachusetts.

“This initiative demonstrates how a lay training center located in a seminary can forge the partnerships necessary at the national, diocesan, and congregational levels for our church to “be the change,” explained the Rt. Rev. J. Neil Alexander, dean of The School of Theology.

Read the full press release here.

Enough About Me...

The youth minister at one of the churches Kammy Young served was famous for making her laugh, when she would be talking to him about something, by politely interrupting and saying, “well, enough about you, let’s talk about me!” So in the spirit of mutuality, assuming that perhaps you’ve heard enough about what’s important to her and the contextual education program, here are some things that are purely for YOU!

  • Fowler Center: Don’t forget that as a field education mentor you can use your University ID card to use any of the facilities at the athletic center on campus.
  • Bookstore: You also receive a discount on the purchase of books at the Sewanee bookstore when you show your University ID card.
  • Colleague group: We’re exploring regional colleague groups facilitated by a professional of your choosing in your area. Please either speak to Kammy or post your thoughts/interest on the Field Ed Mentor Discussion Board on Blackboard.
  • Resources on Blackboard: Speaking of Blackboard, don’t forget that you have access to all the readings, videos, PowerPoint slide shows, etc. that are used in class. If you are still not sure how to access them, we’ll have a 15 minute orientation at 1p.m. as part of our 2014 Mentor Day this Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2014.
  • The School of Theology website: In addition to the resources that can be found on the School's website, the contextual education program has a dedicated section that will continue to expand.

 

 


 


 

Emerging Leaders Conference Registration | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Emerging Leaders Conference Registration

You will be able to pay online using our secure paypal account once you submit the form.

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VocationCARE | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

VocationCARE

Welcome to VocationCARE, a pathway of practices for discernment for your church or ministry, a way of knowing where and how God is calling you in the midst of uncertainty. 

VocationCARE is an arrangement of contemplative, conversational, and design practices for adults of all ages, either as individuals or in small groups. The learning can be easily used for personal and/or collective discernment and can also be used to create new ministry projects and programs.

A VocationCARE training will be offered, June 24–27, 2014, in Sewanee. Designed for those who want to train others to use the CARE practices, this three and one half day immersion will enable participants to bring those practices to their own ministries and be the first step toward being certified as VocationCARE trainers through the programs center. Space in each course is limited, so early enrollment is encouraged.

Some of the ministries that have utilized the VocationCARE practices include:

  • Episcopal Community Services (ESC) of the Diocese of Louisiana
  • Life Together ESC Community of Boston, Mass., Diocese of MA
  • The Road Emmaus House ESC Community, Diocese of Atlanta
  • The Episcopal Diocese of Western North Carolina
  • St Mark's, Rittenhouse Square, Philadelphia, Pa.

Training June 24–27, 2014

This is a full three-day immersion in the CARE practices. All activities will take place at McGriff Alumni House on Georgia Avenue.

Schedule
June 24 — travel day
June 25 — 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
June 26 — 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.
June 27 — 9 a.m.–12 Noon

On Day 1, we will create a space for holy listening and conversation. Our practice includes:

  • Centering exercises
  • Testimony and holy listening engaging our stories
  • Reflecting together theologically on our stories as places where God brings us to life
  • Kinetic visioning exercises

On Days 2 and 3 you will:

  • Review foundational practices for convening VocationCARE circles
  • Learn to think like designers, through a human-centered design process for individual and team-led projects that contextualize VocationCARE in your congregation or ministry
  • Build affinities and project success in teams
  • Present and respond to designs by teams and individuals for new or renewed ministries, i.e., “that thing we are given by God to do”

The schedule is configured to allow ample time for individual and group reflection, journaling, consultations, and appreciative critical feedback from facilitators. 

This training equips each participant to be a facilitator of VocationCARE and is the first of two trainings required for certification. 

For information about registration and accommodations, please call The School of Theology Programs Center at 931.598.1378 or 931.598.1105.

There are three ways to register:

  • You may register online by filling out the form below. You may also pay online using a secure paypal system.
  • If you would prefer to pay by check, please do not use the online form but instead, print the form and mail it with the check to The School of Theology, 335 Tennessee Avenue, Sewanee, TN  37383.
  • You may also call 931.598.1378 and register over the phone.

 

Photo(s) courtesy of Forum for Theological Education (FTE)

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Emerging Leaders Conference | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Emerging Leaders Conference

The programs center of The School of Theology invites church leaders to preview funded training opportunities for lay leadership April 8-11 in Sewanee, Tenn.

At the conference you will:

  • Attend workshops previewing new training and program opportunities for congregations recently funded by the Lilly Endowment and the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society. 
  • Register your congregation or dioceses to be among those eligible for participation in these funded leadership-training opportunities.
  • Meet the directors of eight new program initiatives being offered by the programs center in 2014–2015:
    • Courtney Cowart, director of the programs center and program manager for the Lilly-funded initiative Living in the Green
    • Karen Meridith, director of EfM and program manager for the new EfM post-grad curriculum/training in the essential practices of discipleship
    • The Very Rev. Dr. Christoph Keller, founder and director SUMMA High School Theological Debate Society
    • Jim Goodmann, director of VocationCARE
    • Duncan Hilton, director of programming for the Leadership Development Initiative
    • Kammy Young, program manager for the Missional Enterprise Zone initiative Be the Change
    • Brian Sellers Petersen, senior advisor to the president of ERD and program manager for the Faith, Farm, and Food network
  • Hear key note addresses and engage lively conversations with fellow church leaders on the role of non-degree lay leadership training and programs for young adults in the future of congregational renewal. Remarks presented by:
    • J. Neil Alexander, dean of The School of Theology
    • Wayne Meisel, director of the Center for Faith & Service, McCormick Theological Seminary
    • Joy Anderson, founder and president of Criterion Ventures
    • Duncan Hilton, director of programming for the Leadership Development Initiative
       

A complete schedule may be viewed here.

Speaker bios may be viewed here.

Register online here.

$350 for all conference events, including daily breakfast and lunch plus dinner Wednesday night, and to host a booth at the closing programs fair. Group rate available.

Day rate: $125 per person, group rate available.

Local day rate (Sewanee residents): $100 per person, group rate available.

For information on group rates, please contact Sarah Limbaugh at selimbau@sewanee.edu or call 931.598.1378.

You can download a color flier for printing purposes here.

For more information contact Sarah Limbaugh, selimbau@sewanee.edu, or call 931.598.1378.

 


 

The Beecken Center | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

The Beecken Center

 

One of the greatest challenges and responsibilities we currently face as a religious tradition in the United States is one of cultivating a new generation in the Christian faith, the majority of whom, for the first time in our country’s history, often live their spiritual lives largely outside the ecology of the church and have little experience of Christian community, practice, story, or belief.

The School of Theology's Beecken Center is actively addressing this issue by developing programs to attract and equip multi-generational, more diverse adults for leadership in the Episcopal Church and in the world.

In partnership with the seminary and the college, The Beecken Center is a training destination for those who want to found and nurture ministries and vocational discernment throughout the church. The group process culture and superb model of mentoring developed by Education for Ministry (EfM) will both be extremely important sources of wisdom for this expansion of The Beecken Center’s ministry to the church.

The Beecken Center is offering the following training — VocationCare, JUne 24–27, 2014.

Interested? If you would like to know more about The Beecken Center offerings, please fill out the form below.
 

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Louis Weil Biography | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Louis Weil Biography

Louis Weil is the Hodges-Haynes Professor Emeritus of Liturgics at the Church Divinity School of the Pacific, where he began teaching in 1988. Prior to that, he had taught for seventeen years at Nashotah House in Wisconsin. He began teaching in 1961 as a member of the faculty of El Seminario Episcopal del Caribe, in Carolina, Puerto Rico. He is a priest of the Episcopal Diocese of California.

Weil was born in Houston, Texas, in 1935, and received his B.Mus. at Southern Methodist University in 1956. He received the M.A. in musicology at Harvard in 1958, and then entered the General Theological Seminary in NYC, where he received he S.T.B. in 1961. At that time, he accepted an assignment as a missionary priest in the Diocese of Puerto Rico, where he served congregations in the central mountains. During those same years he was teaching at the seminary near San Juan.

In the field of liturgical studies, Weil’s interests have been wide-ranging, with a primary focus upon the sacraments of initiation and the Eucharist. Other interests have included the place of children in the worshiping community, and the relation of the arts to Christian faith and practice. His published books include: Liturgy for Living, co-authored with the late Charles P. Price (Seabury Press, 1979; revised second edition, 2000);  Sacraments and Liturgy: The Outward Signs (Blackwell, 1983); Gathered to Pray (Cowley, 1986); and A Theology of Worship (Cowley, 1986). His most recent book, Liturgical Sense, was published by Church Publishing in 2013. That same year, at its meeting in Montréal, the North American Academy of Liturgy named Weil the recipient of its Berakah Award for his contributions to liturgical studies both within the Anglican Communion and ecumenically.

Weil is a founding member of Societas Liturgica (1969); of the North American Academy of Liturgy (1973), which he served as president in 1980; and of the International Anglican Liturgical Consultation (1989). He served on the Board of Examining Chaplains for six years (1982-88), and has served for four terms on the Standing Liturgical Commission beginning in 1985. Since retirement, Weil has made his home in El Cerrito, Calif.

EfM Immersion Day | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

EfM Immersion Day

Registration - EfM Immersion Day 2014
Date: Friday, January 10, 2014
Time: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Lunch provided
Place: To be determined by number of registrations

Come join us for a valuable day of active, experiential learning and exploration! You will engage in the EfM process of theological reflection and in discussions of its history, structure, and its transformative effect on participants.
This day of immersion is certain to increase your understanding of how EfM can be a tool for the spiritual development of laity in all communities.

What:
• Learn about the history of the international Education for Ministry (EfM) program
• Experience its content and theological reflection model
• Identify ways you can develop the spiritual growth of laity through EfM

Who:
All seminarians and spouses are invited! For seminarians, this workshop fulfills your EfM graduation requirement. Other alternatives are Mentor Training or previous EfM experience.

How to Register for the EfM Immersion Day
Register with Debbie Shrum in the EfM Office - A218, phone = 598-1775


When registering, please provide the following information:
Full name: _____________________________________________
Name on nametag: ______________________________________
Class in seminary: _______________________________________
Email address: __________________________________________
EfM experience (none, student, mentor, training): ______________
Special (medical/dietary) restrictions:
_________________________________________________
 

Certificate of Christian Spirituality | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Certificate of Christian Spirituality

Students already enrolled in a degree programs may earn a certificate in Christian spirituality by completing coursework and reflecting on experiential learning in the area of spirituality.

To earn the certificate, a student must complete MNST 503 Spirituality for Ministry, must take a further six credit hours in the area of Christian Spirituality (for a total of nine hours), and must undertake two individually directed retreats, as outlined below. The certificate is noted on the student’s transcript.

Retreats
A student planning to make a retreat to fulfill the certificate requirements must submit a proposal to one of the faculty teaching in the area of Christian spirituality for prior approval. The retreats undertaken as part of the certificate program must be in the Christian spiritual tradition. Once the retreat is approved, the student should convey the information, with the faculty member’s signature, to the registrar, who will file the approval. 

One of the retreats is to be taken at St. Mary's Sewanee: The Ayres Center for Spiritual Development, while the other must be taken at a different location. The faculty in Christian Spirituality can offer advice about possible locations.

After completing each retreat, the student must submit a two-page reflection paper, discussing the experience, learnings, and insights from the retreat, to the faculty member who approved the retreat proposal. If the faculty member approves the reflection paper, the faculty member notifies the registrar, who records the completion of the retreat.

Non-Degree Theological Studies | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Non-Degree Theological Studies

For Students in Special Circumstances

Modular, Flexible, Supplemental

At the request of and with the support of the Sewanee bishops, the faculty of The School of Theology has developed a non-degree, basic course of theological studies for candidates for ordination who have special circumstances. This includes those who will be worker-priests in very specific missional contexts, those who will serve small congregations in remote locations on a part-time basis, and others who, in the judgment of the bishop, need only a more limited introduction to theological studies to ground the ministry in which they are already engaged.

It is the understanding of the dean and faculty that persons who are identified for this program by a diocese of The Episcopal Church are those who are being called to serve in very particular, limited environments, nearly always on a part-time basis, and who are persons whose principal income will be derived from non-ecclesiastical sources. In no way does the dean and faculty understand this program to be a substitute for the normative formation of candidates for ministry by the pursuit of a master of divinity degree, nor is this program to be construed as a program in Anglican Studies for those whose theological formation for ministry has taken place in non-Episcopal seminaries or in other denominations. This “academic boot camp” track is to be part of a larger process of formation established by the diocese.

The need for all priests to be able conversation partners with their bishop and fellow presbyters in the defined areas of ministry as set forth in the canons of the church was factored into the course. The seven canonical areas of ministry are typically spread over a master of divinity curriculum with adequate time for reflection and integration. This program provides a basic classroom engagement with the seven canonical areas so that each student will be grounded in the primary questions, concerns, and resources of each canonical area. While the breadth of the Christian tradition will be always considered, the particularities of the Anglican tradition and The Episcopal Church will always be emphasized.

The Components

  1. The academic component represented by the modules outlined below and provided by The School of Theology.
  2. The practice of ministry component designed and provided by the diocese.
  3. The designation by the bishop of a mentor who will meet regularly with the student for supervision, reflection, and coaching.

The office of contextual education of The School of Theology has resources to assist the diocese in creating components 2 and 3 above.

The Modules

  • Each student will participate in four modules per year for two years.
  • Learning will take place in both residential and online formats.
  • A student may begin the program either in January or June. During the residency, students will be introduced to the requirements of the course and immediately begin working with the course content. Time for personal consultation with the faculty will be provided in addition to regular opportunities for prayer and worship, fellowship and conversation, and personal study time.
  • Each residency will be followed by regular online work designed uniquely for each module. Students will be connected online to the instructor and fellow students. This provides an opportunity for asking questions, discussing particular topics, and clarifying assignments.
  • Scheduling the program in this manner makes use of the worship schedule in the Chapel of the Apostles, and the opportunity for fellowship and engagement with students in the M.Div.  and other programs as well as with seasoned clergy who are in Sewanee for advanced degree work and continuing education.
  • A student may enter into the two-year cycle of modules at any point.
  • At the end of each module, each student will receive a written evaluation of their work and a copy of the evaluation will be sent to their bishop.

Module Schedule

The program cycle proceeds as follows with the in-residency dates listed below:

June 2014 – two-week session (June 9-20)
  Week 1 – complete modules began in January
  Week 2 – begin session 2
     Module 1: Ethics and Anglican Moral Theology
     Module 2:  Contemporary Society and Christian Witness

January 2015 – two-week session (January 12-23)
  Week 1 – complete modules began in June
  Week 2 – begin session 3
     Module 1: Church History, including Episcopal Church history and polity
     Module 2: Theology, including sacramental theology

June 2015 – two-week session (dates to be determined)
  Week 1 – complete modules began in January
  Week 2 – begin session 4
     Module 1: Pastoral Theology
     Module 2: Prayer Book and Liturgy

January 2016 – two-week session (dates to be determined)
  Week 1 – complete session 4
  Week 2 – begin session 1
     Module 1:  Old Testament and Preaching
     Module 2:  New Testament and Preaching
 

Admissions and Fees

Because of the wide variety of backgrounds anticipated in those who will participate in the program, the decision to participate in the programs rests solely with the bishop of the diocese from which the student comes.

The School of Theology will send a reminder to all bishops in the fall and spring of each year to register the students they anticipate will begin the program.

Tuition is $2,500 for each session. This is exclusive of food, lodging, and transportation. Costs of the program will be borne by the diocese from which the student originates. Whether the diocese passes the bill along to the student, to the parish the student serves, or in some other manner shares the cost of the program is solely at the discretion of the sending bishop.

Registration

The deadline for registering for the June 2014 session is May 16. Please contact Sandra Brock for details.

2013 DuBose Lectures and Alumni/ae Gathering | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

2013 DuBose Lectures and Alumni/ae Gathering

DuBose Lectures

Ellen F. Davis, Amos Ragan Kearns Distinguished Professor of Bible and Practical Theology at Duke Divinity School, Durham, N.C., will be the guest lecturer at the 2013 DuBose Lectures. The annual DuBose Lectures and Alumni/ae Gathering were endowed by an initial gift from the Rev. Jack C. Graves and substantially increased by a gift from Miss Margaret (Peggy) A. Chisholm of Laurel, Miss., and New York City. The lectures memorialize William Porcher DuBose, second dean of The School of Theology. These lectures focus on a topic of wide appeal in the church. For more information on this year's guest lecturer, click here.

"Biblical Prophecy and Perspectives for Contemporary Ministry"


  • Lecture 1   "Destroyers of the Earth: Economic Critiques of Empire"
  • Lecture 2   "Out of Chaos, Against Complacency: Prophetic Arts of Peacemaking"

Faith, Farm, and Food — A Special Alumni Event

The School of Theology programs center will sponsor a three-day event that will gather church leaders, practitioners of sustainable agriculture, and people involved with food justice issues. This event parallels the topics that will be delivered by Dr. Davis.

The DuBose offering to alumni/ae will consist of a Wednesday morning farm tour and box lunch, from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., and a dinner later that evening. Registration is limited to 20 for the tour and 40 for the dinner. There is no charge for the tour. The cost of the dinner is $70. The tour and dinner will be available as options on the online registration form. You can see the complete description and schedule here.

Continuing Education Workshops

There will be two continuing education workshops offered on Wednesday from 2–4 p.m.

  • The Joy of Giving: A Workshop on Gift Planning: Few clergy enjoy talking about giving and stewardship and even fewer parishioners like hearing about it. But it needn’t be that way. This workshop will show how to approach the subject of giving with parishioners in a fun and easy way. It will look at ways of doing it from an entertaining and informative view from an expert in fundraising. The only thing you need to bring with you is a passion for your mission.
  • New EfM Curriculum: Executive Director Karen M. Meridith will give an overview of the new EfM curriculum launched in September 2013, the first major revision of the program in 15 years, and answer questions from workshop participants.

Alumni/ae Gathering

Thursday evening's festivities will begin at 6 p.m. with a reception. Dinner and dancing follow in Upper Cravens at 7 p.m. The Pat Patrick Band will again provide music for dancing following the dinner.

Alumni/ae and Faculty Book Signing

Alumni/ae and faculty will be on hand to sign their recent publications from 1:15 to 2:15 on Thursday in Convocation Hall. in the Hamilton Hall foyer. If you are an alumnus/a of The School of Theology and would like to participate in this event, please contact Sarah Limbaugh to get details and make a reservation.

Schedule and Registration

The complete schedule is available here. This is the final confirmed schedule.

The online registration form is available at the bottom of this page. Use the online form only if you plan to use a credit card with your submission. If you wish to pay by check, please print out the form and mail to The School of Theology, 335 Tennessee Avenue, Sewanee, TN, 37383. Reminder — please use one form per person.

Lodging

A block of rooms has been reserved at a special rate at the Smoke House Lodge. To reserve one of the rooms at this special rate, use the code “SofT” when making your reservation. Their telephone number is 800.489.2091.

2014 DuBose Lectures

Scheduled for Sept. 30–Oct. 2, the guest lecturer will be Dr. David Brown, professor of theology, aesthetics and culture and Wardlaw Professor at St Mary's College, The School of Divinity, University of St Andrews.

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In-residence Programs | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

In-residence Programs

Bishops-in-Residence

Participants in the bishops-in-residence program spend one week at The School of Theology for a time of reflection, recreation, study, and spiritual renewal. They participate as fully as they choose in the life of the community. Although there is no formal program, bishops frequently celebrate, preach, lecture, or otherwise share their experiences and insights with the seminary. Participation is via invitation.

Fellows-in-Residence

Fellows-in-residence are clergy and laity who spend two weeks at The School of Theology for a time of reflection, recreation, study, and sharing in community. While there is no formal program, fellows are provided with faculty consultants, if they so desire, and opportunities to attend classes and other University events.

The School of Theology is now accepting applications for the fellows-in-residence program. Fellows visit for two weeks to pursue their own programs of academic study and spiritual refreshment, and to share in the seminary community. Each successful applicant receives a $500 fellowship and faculty supervision.

Available Dates

Fall:  Oct. 10–Oct. 31, 2014
Spring:  Feb. 9–20, 2015
Application deadline for either of these dates: June 13, 2014
To apply, please send the following required documents:
1. Curriculum vitae
2. Dates preferred
3. 500-600 word statement about your project

You may email your letter of application along with the above to Sarah Limbaugh at selimbau@sewanee.edu.
 

Church Marketing Workshops | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Church Marketing Workshops

How to Market Your Church 2012

On May 9, 2012, The School of Theology's contextual education program and the office of communications and marketing co-hosted a workshop with the Rev. Jake Dell, senior manager of digital marketing and advertising in the Episcopal Church's Office of Communication. The workshop covered the most effective ways to communicate with your targeted audience. Church leadership from as far away as Jackson and Knoxville, Tenn. and Atlanta, Ga., came to participate. Seminarians along with local alumni/ae rounded out the audience. The workshop, the first of its kind at the School, was open to anyone interested in learning more about websites, social media, and basic marketing campaigns and will be offered on an annual basis going forward.

You may view and download these handouts from the workshop:

How to Market Your Church 2013

On April 5, 2013, The School of Theology's contextual education program and the office of communications and marketing co-hosted a workshop with guest presenters the Rev. Furman Buchanan and Randall Curtis.

Overall Church Marketing Strategies
The Rev. Furman Buchanan, T’06, St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Greenville, S.C.,
• How his past experience as president of a marketing company has helped him market his church

How to Effectively Use Social Media
Randall Curtis, ministry developer for young adults and youth, Diocese of Arkansas
• Social media — what it is, how to use it, great ideas for building and engaging your targeted audience
• Blogs and low cost website alternatives

The Dos and Don’ts of Website Content
Mary Ann Patterson, director of marketing and communications, The School of Theology
• The most effective content for your website — it’s not always what you think!
• Content management — best practices

The Top Apps for Church Use
Alex Andujar, T’14, The School of Theology

Materials and videos from this workshop are available for viewing and dowloading.

Overall Church Marketing Strategies — video, The Rev. Furman Buchanan

Overall Church marketing Stretegies — handout

How to Effectively Use Social Media — video, Randall Curtis

Social Media Strategy Worksheet

Website Content Management — handout

Useful Apps for Church Use — handout

Family Process in Congregational Life and Leadership | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Family Process in Congregational Life and Leadership

Identity, Integrity, Community, Mission: Family Process in Congregational Life and Leadership [3]
The Rt. Rev. Joe G. Burnett

This course will undertake an in-depth review of Edwin Friedman’s approach to family process, and how its wise employment as a pastoral tool can enhance congregational ministry and mission. In so doing we will also engage Friedman’s teaching in such a way as to examine some significant biblical parallels and theological implications that heretofore neither he nor many of his interpreters have discerned or articulated.

The readings listed below will serve as primary texts. We will also make use of a variety of other resources, media, brief ministry studies, and class member contributions designed to simulate reflection and surface new insights with regard to how we love, lead, form, and guide healthy missional communities.

Edwin H. Friedman, Generation to Generation: Family Process in Church and Synagogue (New York: The Guilford Press, 1985).

A Failure of Nerve: Leadership in the Age of the Quick Fix, New York: Seabury Books, 2007

Friedman’s Fables, New York: The Guilford Press, 1990

Roberta M. Gilbert, Extraordinary Leadership: Thinking Systems, Making a Difference, Falls Church, VA: Leading Systems Press, 2006

Peter L. Steinke, Congregational Leadership in Anxious Times: Being Calm and Courageous No Matter What, Herndon, VA: The Alban Institute, 2006

The Oxford Movement, the Liturgy and the Crisis of Faith | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

The Oxford Movement, the Liturgy and the Crisis of Faith

The Oxford Movement, the Liturgy and the Crisis of Faith [3]
The Rev. Dr. Benjamin King

This course will chart the history of the Oxford Movement and its impact on the liturgy and the religious and social beliefs of the Church of England primarily, but also on the wider Anglican Communion. The Oxford Movement did not arise in a vacuum, so the course will begin by exploring the High Church and Evangelical background of late-18th century Britain. Nor did the Movement exist in a vacuum, so we will see its interaction with other Anglicans, as well as the so-called “crisis of faith” later in the 19th century. Finally, we will examine the successors of the Oxford Movement into the 20th century: slum priests, the Liberal Catholics, the liturgical renewal and the parish communion movement.

Suggested reading before the course begins:

Owen Chadwick, Newman: A Short Introduction (Oxford, 2010)

Peter B. Nockles, The Oxford Movement in Context: Anglican High Churchmanship, 1760-1857(Cambridge, 1996)
 

Isaiah and Its Empires | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Isaiah and Its Empires

Isaiah and Its Empires [3]
Dr. Cameron B.R. Howard

This course examines the book of Isaiah in its socio-political contexts, with particular attention to the Neo-Assyrian, Babylonian, and Persian empires. The course evaluates “empire” as category for studying the ancient Near East, traces Israelite prophecy’s responses to shifting political circumstances, and considers ways in which prophecy and empire persist in our contemporary context. The book of Isaiah will be analyzed both in its constituent parts (First, Second, and Third Isaiah) and as a canonical whole.

Berquist, Jon, Judaism in Persia’s Shadow: A Social and Historical Approach, Eugene, Oregon: Wipf & Stock, 2003.

Miller, J. Maxwell, and John H. Hayes, A History of Ancient Israel and Judah, 2nd ed., Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2006. (with particular attention to pp. 221-540)

Smith-Christopher, Daniel, A Biblical Theology of Exile, Minneapolis: Augsburg Fortress, 2002.

 

The Theological Ethics of Stanley Hauerwas | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

The Theological Ethics of Stanley Hauerwas

The Theological Ethics of Stanley Hauerwas [3]
The Rev. Dr. Robert MacSwain

This course will examine the theological ethics of Stanley Hauerwas, one of the most prolific and influential American writers in this field.  Taking both a developmental and thematic approach, topics considered will be such distinctively Hauerwasian issues as vision, virtue, agents and agency, narrative, character, community, suffering, pacifism, medical ethics, the mentally handicapped, and the Church.  Hauerwas’s ambiguous ecclesial status as both Methodist and Episcopalian, with deep indebtedness to the Roman Catholic and Mennonite traditions, will also be considered, as well as his recent attempts to re-focus Christian preaching on theology.

Primary Texts:

Richard Adams, Watership Down (various editions).*

Stanley Hauerwas, The Hauerwas Reader [HR], edited by John Berkman and Michael Cartwright (Duke University Press, 2001).

Stanley Hauerwas, A Cross-Shattered Church: Reclaiming the Theological Heart of Preaching(Brazos Press, 2009).

Stanley Hauerwas, Hannah’s Child: A Theologian’s Memoir (Eerdmans, 2010).*

*texts to be read as background: our time in the classroom will focus primarily on The Hauerwas Reader and A Cross-Shattered Church, although we will discuss Watership Down and Hannah’s Child as well.

Mapping Ritual Structures | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Mapping Ritual Structures

Mapping Ritual Structures [3]
The Rt. Rev. J. Neil Alexander and The Rev. Dr. James Turrell

A seminar on the ritual patterns of the Christian Initiation and Holy Eucharist with attention to the evolution and theology of effective pastoral practice for the church today. Readings will emphasize current pastoral practice against the background of grounded liturgical theology.

Colin Buchanan, ed., Anglican Eucharistic Liturgies, 1985-2010

Maxwell Johnson, The Rites of Christian Initiation: Their Evolution and Interpretation

Paul Bradshaw and Maxwell Johnson, The Eucharistic Liturgies: Their Evolution and Interpretation

Patrick Malloy, Celebrating the Eucharist

James F. Turrell, Celebrating Initiation

 

The Spirituality of Preaching | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

The Spirituality of Preaching

The Spirituality of Preaching [3]
The Rev. Martin Smith

This course will focus on three aspects of the spirituality of preaching. Participants will explore ways in which they appropriate the vocation and identity of the preacher, and the ‘way of the preacher’ as a spiritual path. We will examine sermon preparation as a spiritual practice, and consider various meditative disciplines that may contribute to its depth. And we will reflect on the act of preaching as a religious experience of co-creativity with God.

Participants prepare for the course by reading:

Ruthanna Hooke, Transforming Preaching, Church Publishing 2010

Thomas G. Long, Preaching From Memory to Hope, Westminster John Knox 2009

Martin L. Smith, The Words for Passion: Preaching as the Meeting Place of Divine and Human Desire, 1996 (Booklet available in PDF format on application from Shawn Horton, shorton@sewanee.edu.)

Doctor of Ministry in Liturgy | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Doctor of Ministry in Liturgy

The Advanced Degree Program of The School of Theology offers a track in the Doctor of Ministry degree program with a concentration in liturgy.

Program

The D.Min. in Liturgy concentration is the one of the few such degrees based at an Episcopal seminary and offered in response to a growing need for post-M.Div. study, instruction, and critical practice in liturgy. No more than 10 students will be accepted into the D.Min. in Liturgy degree track each year in order to assure adequate support for their course of study and thesis/project. While fulfilling requirements for the D. Min., students in the D. Min. in Liturgy track will be required to:

• complete five Sewanee Advanced Degree Program courses in liturgy, plus a sixth course in liturgy or a related field (eligible courses are designated in their course description; in certain cases, a relevant course in another discipline, without the designation, may be substituted with permission of the Program Director).

• write a project in liturgics

For more information about the Advanced Degree Program, including details about this summer's courses and professors, click here.


 

M.A. Concentration in Theology and Literature | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

M.A. Concentration in Theology and Literature

Drawing on the distinctive strengths of The School of Theology (including its Advanced Degree Program in the summer), the School of Letters, and the English Department of the College of Arts and Sciences, the M.A. with a concentration in Theology and Literature is a flexible program that acknowledges Sewanee’s unique ability to contribute to an internationally-recognized and vibrant field of interdisciplinary inquiry. The core curriculum ensures an understanding of the biblical narrative and the approaches of modern biblical criticism, while allowing students ample freedom to take appropriate electives in both theology and literature. Beginning and ending the program with two summers in the School of Letters allows students to complete their course-work in 14 months. Students consult with the Program Coordinator to determine the specific shape of their degree, in light of their interests, and will pursue a related thesis project with an appropriate advisor.

Theology Core (16 hours)

Old Testament (6 hrs)
New Testament (6 hrs)
Bibliography, Research, and Writing (1 hr)
Seminar in Theology and Literature (3 hrs)

Students receive a grounding in the biblical narrative and biblical criticism, through completion of the basic survey courses in the Old and New Testaments. Students also take the introductory course in Bibliography, Research, and Writing required of all first-year students.

Electives (24 hours)

Electives are chosen in consultation with one’s adviser from appropriate offerings in The School of Theology, the School of Letters, and the English Department of the College of Arts and Sciences. They are to include at least four courses taken in the School of Letters.

Proposal and Thesis (9 hours)

Students write a formal, academic thesis as the culmination of their work towards the degree. Working in consultation with a thesis adviser chosen by the student, the student develops a proposal in their second summer. The development of the proposal is an important part of the process and forms the foundation of the thesis; therefore, the student registers for three hours of independent study in the second summer. The student is expected to be in regular contact with the thesis adviser over the course of the summer to develop the thesis. The thesis adviser may be drawn from The School of Theology or the School of Letters faculty. Once the adviser has approved the proposal, the student may begin.

After the proposal has been approved, the student registers for six hours of thesis work. The thesis may be undertaken while in-residence, but it is expected that at least some students will choose to write the thesis elsewhere. The thesis is read and assessed by two faculty members, the adviser and a second reader, who assign a grade for the work after an oral defense (which may be accomplished by conference call, Skype, or in-person). A final, library copy of the thesis is submitted to the office of academic affairs for binding; final submission must take place by April 1 for graduation the following May.

The M.A. thesis is an original scholarly monograph, 40 to 60 pages in length.

Typical Paradigm

First Summer: 3 courses (9 hrs)
(2 literature courses in School of Letters)

Fall: 5 courses (13 hrs)
Old Testament I
New Testament I
Bibliography, Research, and Writing (1 credit hour)
2 electives (School of Theology and/or English Department)

Spring: 4 courses (12 hrs)
Old Testament II
New Testament II
Seminar in Theology and Literature
1 elective (School of Theology or English Department)

Second Summer: 2 courses and proposal (9 hrs)
(2 literature courses in School of Letters)
(independent study/thesis proposal)

Thesis (6 hrs)

To learn more about the School of Letters, visit their website.
 

The Rose Model | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

The Rose Model

The ROSE Model is a planning design for educational events aimed at describing and facilitating the clearest and most efficient planning and execution of courses of study and learning events. The term ROSE is an alliteration for rationale, objective(s), strategy(ies), and evaluation, the four steps in preparing a “ROSE” for a given study.

Efficiency is achieved by a mutually agreed upon statement in which the educational event to take place is described in such a way that at the completion of the experience learning may be measured in appropriate ways. A strategy is pro¬vided by which the instructor is guided in accomplishing the teaching. The ROSE gives the student a guide by which they may know what is intended to be taught, what strategies may be used, and what evaluation will take place. This measurement, or evaluation, customarily results in a grade given for the course of study to report the extent to which the objectives of the course have been accomplished by the student.

A carefully designed ROSE Model assures the student that the instructor has planned a course with a specific direction in mind and with the contents of the course fully disclosed from the beginning. The student is saved from a meander¬ing course, which moves at the whim of the instructor. A carefully designed ROSE Model assures the instructor that the students are aware of the requirements of the course. The evaluation to be accomplished is determined in advance so that there are no complaints of unjustified surprise by the students at the completion of the study.

The ROSE Model for any given course of study should be stated as briefly as possible in clear and precise language. The following guidelines are aimed at helping accomplish this clarity and precision:

The RATIONALE indicates why the topic, course title, or lesson is important to the curriculum and the situation of the student at the moment. It may indicate why the learning event comes at the point at which it does in the total learning process of the curriculum.

The OBJECTIVE indicates the specific learning expectation for the student. It indicates what skills, knowledge, or ex¬pertise is sought under the general topic of the course or lesson. Where will the student be in their thinking at the end of the course, or what will they know that they did not know at the beginning of the study? Insofar as is possible, the objectives should be stated in behavioral terms. In courses of cognitive study, however, this is not always convenient or possible.

The STRATEGY is the manner in which the objective or objectives will be accomplished. Here is stated step by step what will take place in the teaching. At The School of Theology, the customary strategies include lectures and semi¬nars, but other kinds of teaching and learning may be included. The reading of texts, interviews with knowledgeable persons, library research, and classroom presentations by the students are other strategies, which may be used.

The EVALUATION is the instrument or activity used to measure the extent to which the student has accomplished the objectives. This instrument or activity may include writing a paper, taking a test, or accomplishing the classroom presentation mentioned above. The evaluation may include classroom participation in discussions. Whatever evalua¬tion is chosen to be accomplished should let the instructor know to what extent the objectives of the course have been achieved by the student. (Practically speaking, it is difficult for the evaluation to cover all elements of the objectives.)

M.A. Concentration in Religion and Environment | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

M.A. Concentration in Religion and Environment

[49 credit hours]

Drawing on the distinctive strengths of The School of Theology, The Center for Religion and the Environment, and the Environmental Studies Program and affiliated departments of the College of Arts and Sciences, the MA with a concentration in Religion and the Environment is a flexible program that utilizes Sewanee’s unique ability to contribute to an internationally-recognized and vibrant field of interdisciplinary inquiry.  After a basic grounding in the tools of biblical studies, theology, and ethics, distribution requirements guide students so they are exposed to a variety of perspectives on environmental issues, ranging from the "hard sciences" to policy studies.  Further elective work within the concentration allows the student to pursue specific interests, and a research project serves as the capstone in the concentration.

Students who have completed similar coursework at the time of matriculation may receive advanced standing for work already completed.

Theology Core (19 hrs):

Old Testament Foundations I
Old Testament Foundations II
New Testament Foundations I
New Testament Foundations II
Introduction to Moral Theology
Systematic Theology I
Bibliography, Research, and Writing

Concentration (27 hours)

Environmental theology (at least 3 hrs)
THEO 560 Creation, Evolution, and God (Crysdale)
THEO XXX Opening the Book of Nature: Creation, Ecology, and Economy (MacSwain/Gottfried)

Environmental Ethics (at least 3 hrs)
PHIL230: Environmental Ethics (Peters)
CEMT XXX: Environmental Ethics (MacSwain)

Environmental Policy (at least 3 hrs)
Fors 201: Natural Resource Issues and Policies (K. Smith)
Fors 270: Water Policy
POLS/ECON 381 Politics of Sustainable Development (Gottfried)
ENST 334. Environmental Policy
ENST 210: The Politics of Energy and Climate Change
ECON 335: Environmental Economics (Econ 101 prerequisite)
ENST 216: Global Environmental Problems and International Politics

Comparative religious environmentalism (at least 3 hrs)
REL 307. Religious Environmentalism (Brown)
REL 341. Religion and Ecology (G. Smith)
RELG 353: Buddhism and the Environment (Brown: offered every two years)
RELG 393: Rural Religion

Environmental Science (at least 3 hrs)
Bio 130 Investigations in Field Biology
Bio 209 Conservation Biology
Bio 210 Ecology
Bio 211 Biodiversity
Chemistry 103: Earth, Air, Water and Fire
Fors 121 Introduction to Forestry
Geol 121 Introduction to Geology

In addition to the fifteen hours listed above, a minimum of nine additional credit hours of coursework will be taken from the above courses or from those on the following list. These will be chosen in consultation with the student’s advisor to create a concentration emphasis on policy, humanities/arts, or science. (To complete the 49 credit hours for the degree, three elective hours may be taken outside of the concentration and the core curriculum.)

Additional courses within the concentration:

ANTH 298 Ecological Anthropology (Ray)
ANTH 312: Place, Ritual, and Belief – Prerequisite: Anth 104 (offered every two years)
ENGL 2??:  Environmental Poetry and Contemplation (coming soon)
ENGL 370: British Romanticism:  the Early 19th Century
ENGL 393: Faulkner (when taught by J. Grammer)
ENGL 394:  Literature of the American South (when taught by J. Grammer)
ENGL 396 American Environmental Literature (also American Studies, Environmental Studies) (John Gatta)
Enst 200 Environmental Studies
ENST 283. Environmental History
ENST 302. Ecology, Evolution, and Agriculture
HIST 100: Environment in History
HIST 386: African Environmental History
MUSC 269: Music of the Birds and Bees: Music and Nature
THEA 4??:  Performing the Environment
RUSS 363:  Environment and Ecocide in Russian Literature
Biology 107: People and the Environment
Biology 109: Food and Hunger: Contemplation and Action
Biology 114: Botany
Biology 200: Entomology
Biology 201: Ornithology
Biology 202: Invertebrate Zoology
Biology 204: Parasitology
Biology 206: Plant Ecology
Biology 207: Biology of Lower Plants
Biology 215: Fungi
Biology 216: Algae and Bryophytes
Biology 221: Environmental Physiology of Plants
Biology 232: Human Health and the Environment
Biology 250: Molecular Evolution
Biology 305: Plant Physiology
Biology 310: Plant Evolution & Systematics
Biology 313: Ecosystems and Global Change
Biology 340: Microbiology
Computer Science 120: Introduction to Environmental Computing
Environmental Studies 201: Organic Agriculture
Environmental Studies 302: Ecology, Evolution, and Agriculture
Forestry 204: Forest Wildlife Management
Forestry 211: Dendrology
Forestry 212: Forestry in the Developing World
Forestry 230: Urban Forest Management
Forestry 303/Geology 303: Soils
Forestry 305: Forest Ecology
Forestry 312: Silviculture
Forestry 314/Geology 314: Hydrology
Forestry 316: Tropical & Boreal Forest Ecosystems
Forestry 319: Natural Resource Management
Geology 121: Physical Geology
Geology 215: Geological Resources
Geology 222: Historical Geology
Geology 230: Paleoecology
Geology 235: Earth Systems and Climate Change
Geology 323: Geology of the Western U.S.
Physics 105: Environmental Physics
Psychology 353: Animal Behavior

Research Project (3 hrs)

The student will undertake an independent research project. This is done in the last year of enrollment.  In the fall term, the student secures the agreement of a reader/adviser from the School of Theology and a reader/advisor from the College to supervise the project.  The student develops a project proposal in consultation with the readers, and no later than November 15 submits the proposal to the program adviser.  The program adviser circulates the proposal to the steering committee, which approves or rejects the proposal.  In the spring semester, the student registers for 3 credit hours of research. The research paper is to be a contribution to scholarly discussion. It is to be 5,500-7,500 words in length, exclusive of documentation and is to be submitted to the faculty readers/advisers once it is completed, no later than April 15 for graduation the following May.

Catalog | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Catalog

The School of Theology catalog represents the policies and procedures that apply to all incoming students at the time of their enrollment for the duration of their program. However, students are expected to abide by policies which may change during their enrollment and current policies may be found on the website.

The School of Theology's academic catalog for 2013–2014 is available below. Beginning in 2012–2013, catalogs may be found online and may be printed from the website. Catalogs prior to 2012–2013 are in print format only.

 

The 2013–2014 Catalog for The School of Theology

The 2012–2013 Catalog for The School of Theology

 

Creation, Evolution, and God | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Creation, Evolution, and God

Dr. Cynthia Crysdale, professor of Christian ethics and theology, and the University of the South will present a daylong conference addressing the question of whether the classical Christian understanding of God as unchanging, omnipotent, and beneficent is still coherent in the face of modern scientific understanding of the cosmos. The conference, based on Crysdale's and co-author Neil Ormerod's forthcoming book, Creator God, Evolving World, will answer “Yes!” Despite claims that evolutionary science rules out belief in a transcendent God, or that we must now adjust our view of God to accommodate change, these scholars insist that modern science and traditional theology are completely compatible. These issues and their implications will be the focus of a series of presentations at the conference.

Videos of the conference may be accessed here.

 

The conference will be held in Guerry Auditorium from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., with a book signing in Convocation Hall prior to the conference. There is no fee to attend and the public is welcome. The conference is sponsored by the University Lectures Committee and the Arrington Lecture Fund.

Schedule

Book Signing: Convocation Hall, 8:30 a.m.–9:15 a.m.
Presenters who have had books published recently will have them available for sale and signing.

Welcome, Guerry Auditorium, 9:30 a.m.–9:35 a.m.
Cynthia Crysdale, Professor of Christian Ethics and Theology, The School of Theology, University of the South

Session 1: Guerry Auditorium, 9:35 a.m. –10:30 a.m.
Creator God, Evolving World 
Neil Ormerod, Professor of Theology, Faculty of Theology and Philosphy, Australian Catholic University, Sydney, Australia
Questions 10:30 a.m.–10:45 a.m.

Session 2: Guerry Auditorium, 10:45 a.m. –11:45 a.m.
Evolution: Is It All An Accident?
David Haskell, Professor of Biology, University of the South
Nathan Wilson, Domain Manager, University of the South
Questions  11:45 a.m.–12:00 Noon

Lunch break, on your own: 12:00 Noonn–1:15 p.m.

Session 3: Guerry Auditorium, 1:15-2:15
God-talk: What kind of Creator Do We Have?
John Haught, Senior Research Fellow at the Woodstock Theological Center, Georgetown University
Rebecca Abts Wright, C.K. Benedict Professor of Old Testament, The School of Theology, University of the South
Questions 2:15 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Session 4: Guerry Auditorium, 2:30- 3:30
Purpose And Providence -- Where Is It All Headed And Does God Care?
Robert MacSwain, Assistant Professor of Theology and Christian Ethics, The School of Theology, University of the South
Tam Parker, Associate Professor of Religion, University of the South
Questions  3:30 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Coffee and Tea Break in Convocation Hall, 3:45- 4:15

Session 5: Guerry Auditorium, 4:15 p.m.–5:15 p.m.
What Difference Does it Make? -- Implications for Lived Christianity
Mollie Roberts, M.Div. Student at The School of Theology, University of the South
Louisa T. Parsons, Rector, St. Francis of Assisi Episcopal Church, Ooltewah, TN
Questions 5:15 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Speakers

Cynthia S.W. Crysdale is professor of Christian ethics and theology. Before coming to Sewanee, Crysdale taught for 18 years at the Catholic University of America. There she served as associate dean for undergraduate programs at the University’s School of Theology and Religious Studies. Crysdale graduated from York University in Toronto, Canada, with a B.A. degree in psychology. She earned M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in theology from St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto.

Neil James Ormerod is the professor of theology at the Australian Catholic University. He has worked professionally as a theologian for more than 25 years. He is widely published in Australia and internationally with articles in leading international journals. Prior to taking up a career in theology he taught mathematics. His theological education was with the Melbourne College of Divinity.

David George Haskell is professor of biology at the University of the South. He received his B.A. from the University of Oxford and Ph.D. from Cornell University. His research and teaching examine the conservation, evolution and ecology of animals. His book, The Forest Unseen (2012, Viking/Penguin), was hailed by E. O. Wilson as “new genre of nature writing, located between science and poetry, in which the invisible appear, the small grow large, and the immense complexity and beauty of life are more clearly revealed.”

Nate Wilson is the domain manager at the University of the South. In that capacity he is responsible for many land management decisions across the 13,000 acre Sewanee campus known as the Domain. Prior to his work for the University, he was a consultant in wildlife biology and forestry on the Cumberland Plateau where he worked primarily with private landowners and conservation NGOS. Nate holds degrees in natural resources management, forestry, and wildlife ecology.

John F. Haught is senior fellow, science & religion, Woodstock Theological Center, Georgetown University.  He was formerly professor in the department of theology at Georgetown University (1970-2005) and chair (1990-95).  His area of specialization is systematic theology, with a particular interest in issues pertaining to science, cosmology, evolution, ecology, and religion. He received his Ph. D. from Catholic University. Haught has authored numerous books, articles, and reviews. He lectures internationally on many issues related to science and religion.

Rebecca Abs Wright is the C. K. Benedict Professor of Old Testament and Biblical Hebrew at The School of Theology. She is an ordained United Methodist minister who loves to teach. Her teaching style not only helps students understand the Old Testament in its historical context, but also how it is relevant to the church today.

A philosophy graduate of Liberty University (B.A., 1992), Robert MacSwain studied theology at Princeton Theological Seminary (M.Div., 1995) and the University of Edinburgh (M.Th., 1996).  His M.Th. thesis, supervised by Fergus Kerr OP, was on Martin Luther and St. Thomas Aquinas as readers of the Apostle Paul. After teaching religion at Brooks School in North Andover, MA, he entered the ordination process in the Episcopal Diocese of East Carolina and completed his clinical pastoral education at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center. This was followed by a year of Anglican studies at Virginia Theological Seminary, and an internship as research assistant to Archbishop George Carey at Lambeth Palace.

Tam Parker is associate professor and chair of the department of religion at the University of the South. She teaches in the area of social ethics, Jewish and holocaust and religious violence studies. Her current project analyses the relation of genocidal  discourses and the building and dismantling of cultures of atrocity.

Mollie M. Roberts is a current seminarian in her senior year at the School of Theology of the University of the South.  Originally from Florida, she has both a bachelors in accounting and an MBA from the University of Central Florida.  Roberts came to seminary from the Diocese of Georgia following an extensive business career which included being a business owner and ten years as a professor in the college of business administration at Savannah State University.

Louisa Tucker Parsons is currently rector of St. Francis of Assisi in Ooltewah, Tenn.  She received her M.Div. from The School of Theology in 2002, 25 years after graduating in the fourth undergraduate class of women accepted at Sewanee with a B.A. in economics. A native East Tennessean, she has served as curate for St. James Episcopal Church in Knoxville and assistant rector of Grace Church in Chattanooga. She also served as hospital chaplain for Memorial Hospital in Chattanooga, and worked for five years was a chaplain for Hospice of Chattanooga.

 

Course Descriptions for the 2012 Advanced Degrees Program | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Course Descriptions for the 2012 Advanced Degrees Program

All classes are scheduled to meet Monday through Friday at the designated times, unless otherwise specified. Most courses require reading prior to the start of class. Each professor has the prerogative to exclude a student from class for failure to meet this requirement. Additional reading may be assigned during the course. The standard guide for written papers in the Advanced Degrees Program is Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, 7th ed., University of Chicago Press, 2007, which reflects the citation of The Chicago Manual of Style, 15th ed.

An Introduction to Ancient Eastern Christianity
Stang, Charles M. [3 hours]

In this course we look closely at early, eastern varieties of Christianity. The history of early Christianity is usually told from the perspective of Greek and Latin-speaking communities, but we will focus our attention instead on the wealth of literature that survives from Christian communities who lived in areas as diverse as Syria, Mesopotamia, Persia, India and China, who largely spoke and wrote in a dialect of Aramaic called ‘Syriac,’ and who have survived as a minority religion from the earliest centuries until today.

To read before the course begins:

Samuel Moffett, A History of Christianity in Asia, Vol. 1: Beginnings to 1500

Primary sources will include:

Gospel of Thomas
Acts of Thomas
Bardaisan, The Book of the Laws of the Countries
Aphrahat, Demonstrations [selections]
Ephrem, Hymns on Paradise
Jacob of Serug
Leontius of Neapolis, Life of Symeon the Holy Fool,
Life of Symeon Stylites
The Acts of Mar Mari the Apostle
Persian Martyr Acts [selections]
Barhadbeshabba, The Cause of the Foundation of the Schools
Timothy I, The Debate on the Christian Faith Isaac of Nineveh, The Second Part [selections]
The ‘Nestorian’ or jingjiao stele

 

The Historical Jesus
Holloway, Paul [3 hours]

Thoughtful Christians and intellectuals in general have long been aware that the Bible offers various theological interpretations of Jesus, which in turn raises the question of how Jesus might be viewed when interpreted through the lens of historical reasoning.  This course will attempt to answer this question and through it the related question of how the earliest interpretations of Jesus themselves were constructed. 

To be read before the course begins:
Sanders, Jesus and Judaism (Fortress Press, 1985)
The Historical Figure of Jesus (Penguin, 1993)

Further Bibliography
Fredriksen, From Jesus to Christ (2nd ed; Yale, 2000)
Raïsänen, The Rise of Christian Beliefs (Fortress, 2010)
Vermes, The Changing Faces of Jesus (Penguin, 2000)
White, Scripting Jesus (Harper, 2010)

 

Preaching in the Liturgical Tradition
The Rev. Dr. William Brosend and Rev. Dr. Benjamin King [3 hours]

This course will explore the distinctive historical, theological, and homiletical features of preaching within Anglican and other liturgical traditions.

Special attention will be paid to key figures and moments in the history of preaching, to the development of the student's own theology of preaching in her or his own tradition, and to the contemporary practice of preaching within those traditions. Students will present sermons in class as a part of their graded work.

To be read before the course begins:

Ellen F. Davis, Wondrous Depth: Preaching the Old Testament
Rowan Williams, Ray of Darkness

 

Caring for Marginalized Populations: Pastoral Care in Context
The Rev. Dr. Gregory C. Ellison II [3 hours]

This course garners "expert" wisdom from scholars and practitioners with distinct disciplinary perspectives who have variously considered the nature and power of human hope and the potential threats to hope faced by marginalized populations and the caregivers who seek to aid them.  Young African American men will serve as a primary lens to investigate the problem of threatened hope, muteness, and invisibility.  However, care for other unacknowledged groups including, but not limited to, the imprisoned, the poor, the wealthy, and the elderly will be discussed.

To be read before the course begins:

Nathan McCall, Them
Donald Capps, Agents of Hope: A Pastoral Psychology
Howard Thurman, Jesus and the Disinherited

 

Types of Anglican Theology
The Rev. Dr. Mark Chapman [3 hours]

This course presents an overview of Anglican theology by addressing official Anglican formularies, liturgies and statements as these relate to different aspects of ecclesiology and theology and across different periods. Rather than a straightforwardly chronological approach, we will discuss the theology and theological implications of ‘official’ and semi-official documents and liturgies of the Church of England, The Episcopal Church, The Anglican Communion, as well as other national and regional churches. We begin with doctrinal statements of the English Reformation and briefly at how these have been understood in non-English Churches, before moving to liturgy, ecclesiology and current issues in Anglicanism. The historical context of each set of texts will be explored by supplementary reading and classroom notes.

To read before the course begins:

*Mark Chapman, Anglican Theology (T & T Clark, 2012) (or more briefly, Mark Chapman, Anglicanism: A Very Short Introduction (OUP, 2006).
Samuel Wells, What Anglicans Believe: An Introduction (Morehouse Publishing, 2011)
 






 

2012–2013 Lecture Series | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

2012–2013 Lecture Series

John Haught
God After Darwin
Sept. 21, 2012
Made possible by The School of Theology

Cynthia Crysdale and Neil Ormerod
Creation, Evolution, and God
Sept. 22, 2012, day-long conference
Made possible by the University Lectures Committee and the Arrington Lecture Fund

Thomas G. Long
Preaching in More Than One Language: Enchantment, Wisdom, and Embodiment

Oct. 31–Nov. 2
, 2012, as part of the 2012 DuBose Lectures and Alumni Gathering
Made possible by the DuBose Lecture Fund

Peter Nockles
The Oxford Movement and the Episcopal Church
March 18, 2013
Made possible by the Beattie Lecture Fund

Stanley Hauerwas
Lecture 1: How to Write a Theological Sentence
Lecture 2: How to Preach Theological Sermon
June 19–20, 2013, (as part of the Advanced Degrees Program)
Made possible by the Arrington Lecture Fund

All lectures are free and open to the public.

Education for Ministry | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Education for Ministry

With the recent renewal of focus on lay theological education, Education for Ministry (EfM) is more than ever a significant part of The School of Theology’s mission to educate and cultivate lay leadership for the Church. EfM is a unique certificate program of experiential theological education for laity under the direction of The School of Theology. Since its founding in 1975, this international program has assisted more than 30,000 students in discovering how to respond to the call of Christian service. EfM helps students encounter the breadth and depth of the Christian tradition and bring it into conversation with their experiences of the world as they study, worship, and engage in theological reflection together.

An EfM group of six to 12 students with a trained mentor meet weekly for two and a half to three hours over the course of a nine-month academic year. Some groups meet in traditional face-to-face small groups in a local parish, others meet entirely online and may include participants in many different places. The program takes four years to complete and is broken up into these courses of study:
• Year One: The Hebrew Bible
• Year Two: The New Testament
• Year Three: Church History
• Year Four: Theology, Ethics, Interfaith Encounter

An EfM group is defined by its harmony of purpose. It is not simply a Bible study group, nor a religious study course, but a small community of praxis focused on study, worship, and intentional theological reflection. There is a balance among these components for none is complete without the other two. The work of reflection is informed by knowledge of the breadth of the Christian tradition and formed by the practice of regular worship together. The study of Christian tradition is deepened through prayerful presence with one another and reflection on the experience of Christians across the centuries as well as across the table. Regular worship together draws from ongoing reflection on the lived life of faith and an understanding of how Christian worship has been and is shaped by culture and context.

Karen Meridith, director of EfM, describes the program this way, "EfM graduates become persons of faith who have internalized a way of looking at the world through a theologically informed lens, who can articulate the call to ministry as baptized members of the Body of Christ, and who are prepared to work humbly with others with different experiences and perspectives. I believe these are just the kind of lay leaders the Church needs as we move forward in mission together."

Students at The School of Theology, along with many of the spouses, attend an EfM Immersion Workshop to acquaint them with this premier educational program for the laity of the Church.

Visit the EfM website for complete details.

An overview of EfM's strategic plan for the future may be found here.

Questions? Interested in learning more about EfM? Fill out this online form and someone will be in touch!

The 2012 Cambridge Summer Preaching Conference | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

The 2012 Cambridge Summer Preaching Conference

Westcott House, the theological college at Cambridge University, U.K.; the Advanced Degrees Program at The School of Theology, the University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn.; and the Episcopal Preaching Foundation are pleased to invite registrations to the Cambridge Summer 2012 Preaching Conference at Westcott House, July 2-5, 2012. An extended session for Advanced Degrees Program students will be held July 5-9.

The conference will bring 12 U.S. and 24 U.K. clergy together for lectures, preaching groups, discussion, and worship under the leadership of Mark Oakley, Martin Seeley, Ellen Wakeham and William Brosend.

Cost

Cost for the conference is £300, including room and board at Westcott House. Registrants should arrange for their own travel. Academy International Travel Services of Atlanta is available to assist if needed.

The additional fee for the extended session is £200 which covers food and lodging only. Tuition for Advanced Degrees Program students is additional and payable to The School of Theology.

A deposit of $400 is due Dec. 15 to reserve a space, and will be accepted in the order received until 12 deposits from the United States are received. After that, names will go on a wait list.

Payment and Registration

Payment for the conference may be made by mail to the Episcopal Preaching Foundation, 335 Tennessee Avenue, Sewanee Tenn., 37383, or by calling Barbara Vitti at 973.467.0070 for deposit by credit card. Partial refunds are possible prior to March 1, 2012. (Note: There are no scholarships from the Foundation or The School of Theology for this conference. Scholarships for tuition costs for Advanced Degrees Program students are available to those students, through the customary financial aid application process.)

For More Information and to Register

Contact Wescott House or send an email to The Preaching Foundation.

2011 DuBose Lectures | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

2011 DuBose Lectures

Note: The 2012 DuBose Lectures, scheduled for Oct. 31–Nov. 2, will feature Dr. Thomas G. Long, Bandy professor of preaching and coordinator of the initiative in religious practices and practical theology at Emory University's Candler School of Theology. The title of his lectures is "Preaching in More than One Language: Enchantment, Wisdom, and Embodiment."

2011 DuBose lectures

The Lectures

Barbara Brown Taylor explored the topic — Learning to Walk in the Dark: Negative Theology for Emerging Christians.

Lecture 1: Scary Angels
Lecture 2: Night Guides
Lecture 3: Treasures of Darkness

The Continuing Education Workshops

Links to videos of the workshops will be available soon.

Reaching Out to Hispanics/Latinos in the 21st Century

Panelists: The Rev. Canon Simón Bautista Betances, Episcopal Diocese of Washington’s Canon for Latino Ministries; The Rev. Richard Aguilar, St. Margaret's and San Francisco de Asis Episcopal Church, Miami Lakes, Fla.; Julio Cuellar, “Cantautor Boliviano,” and The Rev. Judith Comer, St. Philip's Episcopal Church in Fort Payne, Ala. Moderated by John Solomon, Visiting Instructor in Pastoral Spanish, The School of Theology

Presentation topics included the Episcopal Church’s Strategic Vision for reaching Latinos/Hispanics, the nature of the Latino community, how to create community, and some of the challenges that exist.

A celebration of a Holy Eucharist service in Spanish included Spanish songs typical of a Latino service.

The Episcopal Church has produced a strategic vision for reaching Latinos/Hispanics

 

What's New in Parish Christian Formation

Panelists: Sharon Ely Pearson, Christian Formation Specialist at Church Publishing Inc.; The Rev. Carolyn Coleman, Contingent Faculty in Christian Formation; The Rev. Howard Castleberry, T'09, Rector of Christ Church, Nagadoches, Texas. Moderated by Karen M. Meridith, Director of Education for Ministry

The panel offered perspectives on issues encountered "on the ground," information about new trends and resources available, and the role of the seminary in preparing students for ministry that encourages lifelong Christian formation in parishes.

 

The Art of Painting with Words

Panelist: The Rev. Susan Springer, Rector, St. John's in Logan, Utah

This workshop offered preachers hands-on, take-away tools for creating powerful images with words. Participants learned techniques for mining lectionary readings to craft word-pictures that can help bring Scripture and its exegesis alive-and-kicking for the hearer. Springer, T'09, is a book author former faculty member at the Preaching Excellence Program (PEP).

 

Answering God’s Call as a Clergy Spouse

Panelists: Barbara Stafford, Vincent Mathis, Gwen Foss, and Dawn Caldwell. Moderated by Barbara Stafford

Topics for discussion included Work Time vs. Family Time: A Discussion of Useful Guidelines; Get in Where You Fit in: Sorting out Church Work and Worship as a Clergy Spouse; How to Survive the Politics of Church Life; and Creating a Support Group of Clergy Spouses.

 

Photographs

All of the photographs taken during the DuBose lectures and Alumni Gathering are available here for viewing, sharing or downloading.

Advanced Degrees Program | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Advanced Degrees Program

June 9–27, 2014

The Advanced Degrees Program at The School of Theology is a summer program designed to increase professional knowledge in the practice of ministry for clergy. Classes build the relationship between the practice of ministry and biblical, historical, and theological studies by combining learning in community with a cycle of daily prayer and worship in the Anglican tradition. 

2014 Summer Courses

Most students will register for two (2) of the following courses this summer:

"Opening the Book of Nature"
Dr. Robin Gottfried, professor of economics emeritus, and director of the Center for Religion and the Environment, University of the South
Dr. Cynthia Crysdale, professor of Christian ethics and theology, The School of Theology, and co-author of the recently published Creator God, Evolving World

"Preaching Feasts and Holy Days"
Dr. Lauren Winner, assistant professor of Christian spirituality, Duke Divinity School, writes and lectures widely on Christian practice, the history of Christianity in America, and Jewish-Christian relations. Her most recent book is Still: Notes on a Mid-Faith Crisis.  
The Rev. Dr. William F. Brosend, professor of homiletics, The School of Theology, and the executive director for the Episcopal Preaching Foundation.

"Ordination and Eucharist: the Theological Foundations of the Presider's Role"
The Rev. Dr. Louis Weil, Hodges-Haynes Professor of Liturgics, Church Divinity School of the Pacific, author of Liturgical Sense, Church Publishing, 2013.

"Liturgical Time"
The Rt. Rev. J. Neil Alexander, dean of The School of Theology, professor of liturgy, Charles Todd Quintard Professor of Dogmatic Theology
The Rev. Melissa M. Hartley, Ph.D, associate University chaplain

"Anglicanism: Love's Redeeming Work?"
The Rev. Dr. Benjamin J. King, associate professor of Church history, The School of Theology, currently co-editing two books on John Henry Newman for Oxford University Press

"New Testament Theology"
Dr Paul A. Holloway, professor of New Testament, The School of Theology, currently writing the Hermeneia commentary on Philippians

The class schedule may be viewed here.

Advanced Degrees Program Academic Calendar

Petition to Graduate

Checklist for Potential Graduates

 

Fill out my online form.
Field Education Reflections | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Field Education Reflections

Monica Carlson, T'12

I am a senior at The School of Theology. Because I came to seminary from a large suburban parish, I wanted my Field Education experience to be in a smaller rural church.  I also wanted to stay in Sewanee so I could enjoy the beautiful summer here on the mountain. My internship consisted of a 2011 “summer immersion” working with the Rev. Dr. Linda A. Hutton, who leads St. James Church at Midway (midway between Sewanee and Monteagle) and Christ Church in Tracy City, both of which are in the diocese of Tennessee.

Between the generous teaching and counsel of the Rev. Dr. Hutton and the gracious hospitality of the two congregations, I quickly felt like a welcome addition to both of these small churches. In each intimate setting, I was invited to participate in the joy of their worship, preach on several Sundays, hear their stories at coffee hour, and observe the real affection and pastoral care that these close-knit members offered to each other.

My main project for the summer was to help with the planning and implementation of Vacation Bible School, which was sponsored by a number of local Episcopal churches. I witnessed smaller churches pool their resources to offer a program that served the greater community more effectively. Whether in the closeness of the members of each congregation or in the cooperation of churches working together, I was reminded last summer that living and sharing the Christian life involves much more than numbers or material resources.

 

Joseph Wallace, T'12

Wow, what a summer! I had the wonderful opportunity to do my field education immersion in two different congregations — Church of the Advent in Boston, Ma., and St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Atlanta, Ga. I chose these two congregations because both are deeply committed to evangelism in their respective communities. But more specifically, I chose the Church of the Advent because of its rich history of Anglo-Catholic worship and evangelism. I chose St. Paul’s because it is perhaps one of the largest, and still growing, African-American/Afro Caribbean congregations in the Episcopal Church.

While at the Advent I had the opportunity to preach, administer pastoral care, and serve as sub deacon at the Feast of Corpus Christi, which included solemn benediction and a procession of the Blessed Sacrament through the streets of Boston with a brass band. My heart was lifted to heaven! During my time at the Advent I was impressed at the ability of the liturgy to change hearts and spread the gospel of Jesus Christ through beauty and a warm welcome.

Although I am an African-American, I have never had an opportunity to truly worship in a predominantly African-American/Afro Caribbean environment. This for me was indeed a great joy and honor. During my time at St. Paul’s, I learned the importance of dynamic preaching and how to help a struggling congregation to grow not only in pledges, but also most importantly, how to spread the Word of God and equipped the saints for the work of ministry in an inner-city setting. In addition to honing my preaching skills, I was able to draw on all of my New Testament class notes and lectures to teach a five-week adult Christian education bible study. The best compliment I received from one of the participants was that in addition to my teaching the intellectual things, I made it relevant to their life’s issues. I thank God for such a wonderful opportunity to share my summer with two very wonderful congregations.

 

Evelyn Harris, T'13

I spent six weeks in Vienna, Austria, working full time as an intern at the English Speaking United Methodist Church. The congregation is made up of around 200 refugees, diplomats, contract workers, migrants, ex pats, students, and many others who come to Vienna from over 35 different countries, including other parts of Austria. The tie that binds this community together is that they are all strangers in a strange land who crave familial relationships with others, not only to worship and praise God, but also to rejoice, cry, hope, and dream together as a community.   

In my field education experience I was able to attend the Austrian Annual Conference and I learned how to conduct pre-marital counseling and a wedding.  I also helped lead confirmation classes, bible studies, and worship services. I also interviewed congregation members to examine how multicultural power dynamics played into congregational dynamics. Since this church is entirely self-funded, I am currently putting together videos to help the ESUMC share their story back here in the U.S.

 

Brandon Mozingo, T'12

As Christendom fades and the Church continues to lose membership, we must face the reality that the majority of those that need ministry exist out in the world, and not within the walls of our churches. If we wish to reach them, we must reach out to them. My field education experience as an internship with Seamen’s Church Institute allowed me to do this very thing.

I was honored to be the first River Chaplain Intern of an organization that has been supporting the Merchant Marine since 1834. Founded to offer hospitality and safety to sailors, it has since expanded to include professional education, legal support, and the outreach of chaplains.

Working along beside the crews of these boats, I rode the waters of the Ohio and Kanawha Rivers, as well as the Intercostal Waterway. Never spending more than two nights on any one craft, I hopped from boat to boat, attempting to maximize my contact with the over 100,000 members of the Merchant Marine. Making myself available to be whatever these people needed, I found myself engaged in pastoral care, theological discussion, christenings, cooking meals for the crew, Bible study, helping to load supplies, worship services, and assisting a painting work detail.

Somewhere on the Ohio River, a crew stands a little bit taller after their towboat is christened. Gathering together, the blessing they pray upon their boat gives their work and their life a heightened sense of purpose.
 

Masters of Sacred Theology in Anglican Studies (S.T.M./A.S.) | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Masters of Sacred Theology in Anglican Studies (S.T.M./A.S.)

The S.T.M. in Anglican Studies program provides the opportunity to acquire fuller mastery in that field and is suitable for those previously ordained in another denomination who plan to be ordained in the Episcopal Church.

Program

An S.T.M. with a concentration on Anglican Studies requires one year of full-time study. This is done during one summer and one academic year. The 30 semester hours are achieved with six hours in a summer session, 18 hours in the Anglican Studies Program and a thesis for six hours credit. The student must write a thesis that demonstrates scholarly competence. The degree must be completed within two years of initial matriculation. Admission requirements are the same as those for the S.T.M. degree.

Components of the S.T.M. in Anglican Studies Courses. The student will take two courses (six hours) in a summer session and 18 hours in the Anglican Studies Program during the academic year. There are four core courses in the first semester and two in the second semester designated for those on the ordination track.

Thesis

The student will be required to complete a thesis demonstrating scholarly competence in the area of Anglican Studies. The process for the thesis is stated in the D. Min. section.

Examination

An oral defense covering the area of the thesis and major specialization is also required.

Masters of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.) | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Masters of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.)

The Master of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.) degree provides the opportunity to gain further mastery in a chosen area of theological study. Students will attain and apply the skills needed for scholarly research in a theological discipline at an advanced level. The S.T.M. program is intended for those who may wish to prepare for graduate study at the doctoral level, preparation for various forms of teaching, the scholarly enhancement of ministerial practice, or disciplined reflection in an area of ministry.

Program

The Master of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.) degree program may be taken during the summer sessions, or in a combination of summer session(s) and term(s) during the academic year. Students must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of academic credit with a grade point average of B or higher. Six of the hours must be in the form of a thesis. The student, working in consultation with an advisor from the faculty of the School of Theology, will develop a proposal and write a thesis demonstrating scholarly competence, and pass an examination covering the area of the thesis and major specialization.

The Association of Theological Schools states the S.T.M. degree should be completed within six years. A student who experiences extenuating circumstances which prevent him/her from finishing in six years may petition the Advanced Degrees committee to allow one or two additional years for completion. A continuance fee may or may not be required. The petition must set forth the reasons why an extension is necessary and should be accompanied by appropriate documentation. The committee’s refusal to authorize an extension of a student’s course of study is final. In no case may a student take more than eight years to complete a degree.

Thesis

The student will be required to complete a thesis demonstrating scholarly competence. A grade point average of B or higher is required to register for thesis hours. The process for the thesis is stated in the D. Min. section.

Examination

An oral defense covering the area of the thesis and major specialization is also required.

Doctor of Ministry in Preaching (D.Min) | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Doctor of Ministry in Preaching (D.Min)

The Advanced Degree Program of The School of Theology offers a track in the Doctor of Ministry degree program with a concentration in preaching.

Program

The D.Min. in Preaching degree is the only such degree based at an Episcopal seminary and is offered in response to a growing need for post-M.Div. study, instruction, and critical practice in preaching. No more than eight students will be accepted into the D.Min. in Preaching degree track each year in order to assure adequate support for their course study and thesis project. While fulfilling requirements for the D. Min., students in the D. Min. in Preaching track will be required to:

  • complete a minimum of four Sewanee Advanced Degree Program courses in homiletics; a course with a strong preaching component may be substituted with permission of the program director
  • complete a minimum of two Sewanee Advanced Degree Program courses in biblical studies
  • submit video or audio files of preached sermons throughout the year to the professor of homiletics and cohort group for discussion and critique
  • write a project in homiletics

Scholarships

The Episcopal Preaching Foundation has generously offered two scholarships per year to students in the D.Min. in Preaching program. Interested students should complete the D.Min. application and a financial aid form

Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.) | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.)

The courses of study found in the Doctor of Ministry program are designed to enable participants to attain excellence in the practice of ministry. The program provides persons actively engaged in professional ministry the opportunity to develop further the attitudes, skills, and knowledge essential to their ministry. The D.Min. program stresses the relationship between the practice of ministry and biblical, historical and theological knowledge. The level of class-work in the D.Min. program assumes that the applicant has the general knowledge acquired in a M.Div. program. The D.Min. program is not intended to prepare persons for graduate teaching.

See details of the 2014 courses and lecturers.

The Program

Students admitted to the program must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours with a grade point average of B or higher. Three or six of the hours must be achieved in the form of a project, which will be defended orally.

The student, working with the Director of the Advanced Degrees Program (Director), will develop a program of study designed to accomplish his/her educational objectives. It is imperative that the program have integrity and coherence and not be simply the accumulation of credit hours.

Courses are designed to develop professional skills and to relate biblical, historical and theological materials to the practice of ministry.

Length of Program (D.Min. and S.T.M.)

The program of study for the S.T.M. and D.Min. consists of two courses in each of four consecutive summers and the completion of the project/thesis during the fifth year. Because circumstances may require a student to alter this plan, a sixth year of enrollment is available. A student who needs to miss a summer during the first four years, or needs more than one year to finish the project/thesis, may notify the program director and pay a continuance fee of $150 to remain enrolled in the program.

The Association of Theological Schools states the S.T.M. and D.Min. degree should be completed within six years. A student who experiences extenuating circumstances which prevent him/her from finishing in six years may petition the Advanced Degrees committee to allow one or two additional years for completion. A continuance fee may or may not be required. The petition must set forth the reasons why an extension is necessary and should be accompanied by appropriate documentation. The committee’s refusal to authorize an extension of a student’s course of study is final. In no case may a student take more than eight years to complete a degree.

The D. Min. Workshop

The Workshop is offered on alternating years, and is customarily taken in the second year of the D.Min. and prior to submission of the project proposal. The Workshop meets once per week over the summer and affords students the opportunity to explore topics appropriate for the D.Min. project, including research and writing requirements for a successful project.

The Project/Thesis

The student will be required to complete a substantial project for three or six credit hours. A grade point average of B or higher is required to register for project/thesis hours. The scope and depth of the project will determine the number of credit hours. Some of the criteria used to determine credit given are:

  1. anticipated length of time to be devoted to the project
  2. quality and quantity of the written component
  3. originality and significance of the project.

The project should have a professional focus; it should provide opportunities for reflection on professional development, for the integration of academic learning experiences and one’s own professional situation, and for moving forward in one’s understanding and practice of ministry. Some possible methodological approaches are:

  • Action/reflection model – a presentation of the results growing out of some direct engagement within a context of ministry.
  • Program model — a presentation or description of program possibilities (educational, liturgical, homiletical, pastoral, etc.) designed by the student for his/her work.
  • Thesis or essay — a study of some topic related to the integration of one’s academic work and professional focus.

The ministry project should demonstrate the candidate's ability to identify a specific theological topic in ministry, organize an effective research model, use appropriate resources, and evaluate the results, and should reflect the candidate's depth of theological insight in relation to ministry.

A meeting with your advisor is required when you start the project. Additionally a meeting with the second reader is required if the project is 6 hours. Upon completion of the doctoral project, there shall be an oral presentation and evaluation. The completed written project, with any supplemental material, should be accessioned in the institution’s library.

Project/Thesis and Candidacy

After the completion of 12 credit hours, the student will submit a written statement requesting candidacy and the project proposal. In preparation for the project proposal and candidacy request, the student will talk with the director about the general subject of the project. The director will work with the student to choose an advisor for the preparation of the proposal. The advisor will be a member of the full time teaching faculty of The School of Theology, and will serve as the first reader. Guidelines will be provided for writing the request, the project proposal, and the project itself.

To be granted candidacy the student must have a B average in his/her D.Min. work already completed, must have his/her project proposal approved, and must show the progress made toward meeting his/her goal as stated in the application. The student will develop the project proposal with the guidance of his/her chosen advisor, and following the advisor’s approval will present the proposal to the Advanced Degrees Committee. The Advanced Degrees Committee will review each student’s candidacy request and project proposal and either approve them, ask the student to address concerns and resubmit, or reject candidacy.

Upon approval of a project, the committee will select, or approve the student’s request of, the second reader. The committee will consider the project subject and faculty members’ workload and availability when selecting readers. The director will ask the faculty member(s) if they are willing to serve and notify the student upon agreement. The first reader is the advisor for the project. The second reader provides a second look at the project based on the larger scope of a six hour project. Readers are also faculty of The School of Theology. On occasion, an outside person with particular expertise in the project subject may be contracted as a second reader. The student is responsible for obtaining this person’s verbal agreement, and the director will follow up with the program guidelines and formal contract offer. The University requires a signed contract prior to beginning the work.

The student who chooses to complete the 24 or 27 credit hours before beginning work on the project, will register for the project hours and pay the tuition in January following completion of the credit hours. Students, who wish to register for three of the project hours during a summer while taking a course, will pay for the hours as part of registration. For example, a student would register for one course and 3 project hours during the fourth and fifth summers. The project must be defended orally prior to submission of the final “library” copies of the written project.

Certificate of Theological Studies (C.T.S.) | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Certificate of Theological Studies (C.T.S.)

The Certificate of Theological Studies is designed for students who wish to pursue graduate theological education without earning a degree. The Certificate of Theological Studies program is shaped in consultation with the student’s advisor to meet the needs of the individual. It requires full-time study in residence over one or two semesters. Students in this program take part in the worship life of the seminary by attending at least one chapel service on each weekday, including the principal Eucharist on Wednesday.

Gainful Employment Program Disclosure

Anglican Studies Program (D.A.S.) | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Anglican Studies Program (D.A.S.)

Anglican Studies is a special program that examines Anglican theology, history, spirituality, liturgy, preaching, and polity. This program is designed primarily for those who already have a divinity degree and have transferred from the ministry of other communions to ministry in the Episcopal Church. Students are introduced to the Anglican ethos through study of the common heritage and present identity of churches comprising the Anglican Communion, and through study of the development of Anglicanism.

Ordinarily, the applicant for Anglican Studies has a Master of Divinity (M.Div.) degree from an accredited seminary. Most such applicants pursue the Diploma in Anglican Studies, which normally requires one academic year’s residence, appropriate course work, and participation in the worship life of the seminary community by attending at least one chapel service on each weekday, includ-ing the principal Eucharist on Wednesday.

Diploma in Anglican Studies Curriculum

Advent Semester
  • CHHT 501. Episcopal Church History (3 Hours)
  • THEO 521. Systematic Theology II (3 Hours)
  • LTCM 521. Pastoral Liturgics (3 Hours)
  • MNST 511. Pastoral Theology I (3 Hours)
  • MNST 503. Foundations of Christian Spirituality (3 Hours)
  • Total: 15 Hours
Easter Semester
  • LTCM 511. History of Christian Worship (3 Hours)
  • HOML 510. Advanced Preaching (3 Hours)
  • MNST 512. Pastoral Theology II (3 Hours)
  • MNST 512. Contextual Education I (3 Hours)
  • LTCM 507. Singing the Word (1 Hour)
  • Total: 13 Hours

Total: 28 Hours

Non-credit Graduation Requirements
  • Constitution & Canons Workshop
  • Sexual Boundaries Training
  • Safeguarding God’s Children workshop
  • Anti-Racism Training
  • Education for Ministry Immersion

Qualified applicants may instead pursue the degree of Master of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.) in Anglican Studies, which normally entails one summer of study in the Advanced Degrees Program, study in residence during the academic year, and the writing of a thesis.  See the section under Master of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.), below for more information.

Gainful Employment Program Disclosure

Master of Arts (M. A.) | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Master of Arts (M. A.)

The Master of Arts (M.A.) program of The School of Theology is designed as a general academic degree for people who wish to begin advanced study of theological disciplines in a church-related setting. It involves a two-year course of study, following either a general program or pursuing a concentration in a particular discipline. Advanced standing may be granted to those who come with previous work in the theological disciplines. It also may be the appropriate degree for some ordained American and international students with previous theological study. On its own, this degree does not satisfy the canonical requirements for ordination. Students in this program take part in the worship life of the seminary by attending at least one chapel service on each weekday, including the principal Eucharist on Wednesday.

Master of Arts Curriculum

Candidates for the M.A. degree complete required core courses and required distribution courses. They must choose one of two tracks: a general track or a concentration. Candidates on the general track compile a portfolio of work completed for their courses.

Candidates opting for a concentration register for three credit-hours of research in their field and write an article-length paper of high quality.

Core curriculum

Core courses (25 hrs.)
  • Old Testament Foundations I
  • Old Testament Foundations II
  • New Testament Foundations I
  • New Testament Foundations II
  • Church History I
  • Church History II
  • Intro to Moral Theology
  • Systematic Theology I
  • Systematic Theology II
  • Bibliographies, Research, and Writing
Distribution courses (6 hrs.)
  • 1 additional course in Ethics (3 hrs.)

Additional hours are taken as electives.

Total hours required: 49 hrs.

Master of Arts—General Track

The general track is intended for those who seek a broad grounding in the theological disciplines. Students on the general track complete the core and distribution courses and take elective courses to further their knowledge.

M.A. students on the general track assemble a portfolio of their assignments for evaluation, prior to graduation.

Portfolio

Portfolio contents are currently under discussion in the Curriculum and Program committee, and a proposal about specific contents and evaluative process will be submitted at a later date.

Master of Arts with Concentration

The concentration is designed for those students who intend to pursue further graduate education in theology or its cognate disciplines. It may be appropriate in some cases for those who do not plan to pursue doctoral study but who expect to teach in a specific discipline in institutions overseas. Candidates for the M.A. may concentrate in one of five areas: Bible, Church History, Theology, Religion and Environment, and Theology and Literature.

Coursework for Concentration

Courses taken in the core curriculum may be counted towards the hours required for a concentration.

Research Paper

A research paper is required of those M.A. students pursuing a concentration.

To undertake the research paper (and therefore a concentration), the student must complete the Research and Writing course in the first year of study. After completing the course, the student must gain the recommendation of the instructor of the Research and Writing course and the approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The student must also have the endorsement of a faculty member in the area of concentration, who will serve as the project advisor.

The student registers for three credit hours of research. The student meets regularly with the project advisor for guidance in research and writing.

The research paper is to be a contribution to scholarly discussion. It is to be 5,500-7,500 words in length, exclusive of documentation and is to be submitted to the project advisor once it is completed. Once she or he approves the paper, the project advisor submits a grade for the paper to the registrar.

Non-credit Degree Requirements

  • Sexual Boundaries Training
  • Safeguarding God’s Children workshop
  • Anti-Racism Training
  • Education for Ministry Immersion
Master of Divinity (M.Div.) | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Master of Divinity (M.Div.)

An Elective (3 hours)An Elective (3 hours)

The Master of Divinity (M.Div.) curriculum of the School of Theology is designed to provide students with the spiritual formation, knowledge, and skills required to become committed, effective ordained clergy. Throughout the three years students have an opportunity to explore their pastoral vocation and to be formed in Christ’s own priesthood given to the church and expressed in a variety of baptismal minis-tries. To this end, the curriculum includes study of Scripture, the Christian tradition, and modern cultures, with a view to the reasoned practice of the ministry of Word and Sacrament in both its historical context and its contemporary setting.

Curriculum: Orderly Progress of Learning

The Master of Divinity program is designed to educate a critically informed clergy for ministry in a changing world. The School of Theology has consistently been committed to the task of integrating the various areas of theological study within a basic core curriculum. After the first introductory course in any area, other courses at second and third levels allow the student to advance to more critical and intensive engagements of the subject matter. The guiding norm of the entire seminary program of the School of Theology is the orderly progress of learning.

Electives allow students to focus their attention and advance their learning in selected areas of academic and practical interest. Lectures, seminars, and small group reflections all contribute to the ongoing task of critical and practical integration of the traditions of theological learning with life in the contemporary world.

To help students achieve continuity in their educational experience, the school provides each student with a faculty adviser. Faculty members work with their advisees to assist them, according to their special interests and needs, to integrate the many elements and dimensions of a theological education.

Spiritual Formation

Christian ministry requires leaders who are sensitive to the presence of God in their own lives and in the lives of those with whom they are called to serve. Through daily worship, prayer, study, spiritual direction, and quiet days, the School of Theology seeks to develop in its students such an awareness and pattern of life.

Worship Life

The curriculum is grounded in worship. Morning Prayer, the Holy Eucharist, and Evening Prayer are celebrated each weekday in the Chapel of the Apostles. Students and faculty take part in at least one of those offices daily, including a weekly community Eucharist. Through participation in the church’s liturgical life, students deepen their awareness of the meaning of worship and are provided opportunities to develop their skills in the ordering and conducting of a variety of Prayer Book rites. Students and faculty participate in planning, leading, and preaching in services.

The dean has responsibility for the spiritual and community life of the School of Theology. He or she is the ordinary of the Chapel of the Apostles.

Course Requirements

The curriculum for the M.Div. degree requires 74 core hours for graduation. This curriculum allows for concentration of electives in areas of interest or perceived need. To retain the status of regular (full-time) student, at least 12 credit hours must be taken for credit each semester.

M.Div. Core Courses

Junior Curriculum
Advent Semester
  • BIBL 501. Old Testament Foundations I (3 Hours)
  • CHHT 511. Church History I (3 Hours)
  • BIBL 511 New Testament: Foundations I
  • MNST 503. Foundations of Christian Spirituality (3 Hours)
  • THBR 531. Bibliography, Research, and Writing (1 Hour)
  • Total: 13 hours
Easter Semester
  • BIBL 502. Old Testament: Foundations II (3 Hours)
  • CHHT 512. Church History II (3 Hours)
  • BIBL 511. New Testament: Foundations II (3 Hours)
  • LTCM 507. Singing the Word (1 Hour)
  • An Elective (3 hours)
  • Total: 13 Hours
Summer

Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) is ordinarily taken in the summer after the Junior year, if it was not taken before matriculation.

Middler Curriculum
Advent Semester
  • HOML 530. Introduction to Preaching (3 Hours)
  • MNST 511. Pastoral Theology I (3 Hours)
  • THEO 511. Systematic Theology I (3 hours)
  • An Elective (3 hours)
  • Total: 12 Hours
Easter Semester
  • THEO 511. Systematic Theology I (3 Hours)
  • LTCM 511. History of Christian Worship (3 Hours)
  • MNST 512. Contextual Education I (3 Hours)
  • CEMT 511. Intro to Moral Theology (3 hours)
  • Total: 12 Hours

* Elective Course (3 Hours)

* Elective hours must include at least one 3 credit-hour course in church history (from an approved list), taken after the CHHT 511/512 sequence.

* Students must take one elective course to maintain full-time status of 12 credit hours per semester.

Senior Curriculum
Advent Semester
  • MNST 522. Contextual Education II (3 Hours)
  • CEMT 522. Contemporary Moral Issues (3 Hours)
  • WREL 501 World Religions (2 hours)
  • WREL 502 Missiology (1 hour)
  • LTCM 521. Pastoral Liturgics (3 Hours)
  • Total: 12 Hours
Easter Semester
  • MNST 525. Christian Education (3 Hours)
  • HOML 510. Advanced Preaching (3 Hours)
  • MNST 512. Pastoral Theology II (3 Hours)
  • An Elective (3 hours)
  • Total: 12 Hours

* Elective Course (3 Hours)

* Students must take one elective course to maintain full-time status of 12 credit hours per semester.

Total: 74 HOURS

Non-credit Degree Requirements
  • Clinical Pastoral Education
  • Constitution & Canons Workshop
  • Sexual Boundaries Training
  • Safeguarding God’s Children workshop
  • Anti-Racism Training
  • Education for Ministry Immersion
  • Chapel participation, as scheduled

Portfolio

Beginning with students entering in 2009, each M.Div. student will maintain a portfolio, filed with the office of the registrar of the School of Theology. A completed portfolio is a degree requirement.

A complete portfolio includes the following (all tests and papers are to have been graded, with the instructor’s comments):

  1. One Theology paper or exam (from THEO 511 or 521) or Ethics exam (from CEMT 511 or CEMT 522)
  2. One written, exegetical assignment from Old Testament I or II, or New Testament I or II
  3. One exam from Pastoral Theology I or II
  4. One exam or paper from either Church History I or II
  5. The final exam from Pastoral Liturgics *
  6. One sermon text plus a DVD of the delivery of the sermon
  7. The Field Education evaluations
  8. The Middler Evaluation

* Not required of UMC students.

Exams and papers will be submitted as hard copies and scanned, to preserve faculty grades and comments. DVDs will be placed in the student’s permanent file.

Class Registration | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Class Registration

Academic Year Registration

Registration for the academic year is held the Monday or Tuesday before school begins on Wednesday. Registration includes meeting with The School of Theology Registrar, Mary Turner, to confirm core courses and to add electives if desired. It also includes things such as registering your vehicles, getting keys to Hamilton Hall, completing IRS paperwork for work study, and meeting with student accounts regarding any remaining tuition due.

For those rare students who begin their studies in January, much of this is done via email in combination with a meeting with the Registrar upon arrival in Sewanee.

After the initial registration in August or January, you will register yourself using the BannerWeb self-service system. This system also allows you to review your class schedule, view grades, print unofficial transcripts, view payroll information, etc.

Advanced Degrees Program Registration

Students in the Advanced Degrees Program register and pay their bills prior to arriving for summer school. Bills are mailed in early May and June and payment must be received prior to starting classes.

Registration normally begins on March 15. Registration forms, with descriptions of that summer’s courses, will be available on the website. There is normally a limit of 30 students per class. While registration changes may be made through registration day, it can be difficult to do the required reading before classes begin.

 

To see a complete listing of the class schedule, click here.

Policies & Regulations | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Policies & Regulations

STUDENT CLASSIFICATIONS

Regular students (full-time) are those who have been admitted to a degree program and take 12 or more credit hours per semester. (six hours in the summer)
Regular students (part-time) are those who have been admitted to a degree program and who, with the consent of the dean and faculty, are taking less than 12 credit hours per semester. (less than six hours in the summer)
Non-degree-seeking students (full-time) are those who, under the direction of the dean and the faculty, pursue studies not directed toward a degree, such as the Diploma in Anglican Studies or the Certificate in Theological Studies.
Special students are non-degree-seeking, part-time students who do not go through the admission process but submit a special student application for approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.
Upon approval, the student may take a course for credit or audit with the written permission of the instructor.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Graduation from The School of Theology follows the successful completion of all requirements for the specified degree program and the approval of the degree by the Senate of the University upon nomination by the faculty of The School of Theology.
A Master of Divinity student, who has been evaluated as “adequate” in all prescribed work, has fulfilled the clinical pastoral education and field education requirements, has completed all non-credit degree requirements, has submitted a complete portfolio, and who has a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.33, is eligible for the award of the degree of Master of Divinity. Work toward the M.Div. degree is to be concluded within five consecutive years from the date of matriculation.
A Master of Arts student who has been evaluated as “adequate” in all prescribed work, has completed all non-credit degree requirements, has submitted a complete portfolio if applicable, and who has a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.33, is eligible for the award of the degree of Master of Arts (M.A.). Work toward the M.A. degree is to be concluded within four consecutive years from the date of matriculation.
A Master of Sacred Theology student, who has been evaluated as “adequate” in all prescribed work, has completed all non-credit degree requirements when applicable, and who has a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0 is eligible for the award of the degree of Master of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.). Work toward the S.T.M. degree is to be concluded within six consecutive years from the date of matriculation.
A Doctor of Ministry student who has been evaluated as “adequate” in all prescribed work and who has a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0 is eligible for the award of the degree of Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.). Work toward the D.Min. degree is to be concluded within six consecutive years from the date of matriculation.
Graduation from a non-degree program of The School of Theology follows the successful completion of all requirements of that program and approval by the faculty of The School of Theology.
A Diploma of Anglican Studies student who has been evaluated as “adequate” in all prescribed work and has completed all non-credit program requirements is eligible for the award of the Diploma of Anglican Studies (D.A.S.). Work toward the D.A.S. program is to be concluded within two consecutive years from the date of matriculation.
A Certificate of Theological Studies student who has been evaluated as “adequate” in all prescribed work for the one or two semesters of enrollment and has completed all non-credit program requirements is eligible for the award of the Certificate of Theological Studies.

HONORS

The faculty of The School of Theology may confer honors on up to 10 percent of the graduating class receiv¬ing the degree of Master of Divinity, with honors based on final cumulative GPA and the faculty’s determina¬tion of each student’s excellence. All grades for courses taken in the Master of Divinity program at The School of Theology will be used to calculate GPA for confer¬ring of honors. Grades for transfer credits will not be considered.

EVALUATION OF ACADEMIC PROFICIENCY (M.Div., M.A., S.T.M., DAS, CTS)

Academic Year
Satisfactory academic progress at The School of Theology is defined as eligibility to re-enroll in the specific degree program for the following semester. Letter grades are given on a 4.0 scale ranging from A to F.
A student’s cumulative grade point average is computed on a 4.0 scale and is recorded on his or her transcript. A student seeking the first theological degree or certificate (M.Div., M.A., D.A.S., C.T.S) with less than a 2.33 grade point average is evaluated by the faculty as either “Provisional” or “Inadequate.” An advanced degree (S.T.M.) student with less than a 3.0 grade point average is evaluated by the faculty as either “Provisional” or “Inadequate.” A student who receives an F in any semester is rated as “Provisional,” and more than one F as “Inadequate.” A student rated as “Inadequate” is dismissed; if rated “Provisional,” the student may remain but must rise to the status of “Adequate” by the end of the following semester in order to remain in school. In accordance with the regulations of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the University of the South does not certify, for VA benefit purposes, any student who fails to meet the minimum academic standard to be in good standing with the University.

Summer Session (S.T.M., D.Min.)
Letter grades are given on a four-point system ranging from A to F. A student’s cumulative grade point average is computed on a 4.0 scale and recorded on his or her transcript. A student with less than a 3.0 grade point average is evaluated by the committee as either “provisional” or “inadequate.” A student who receives an F in any course is rated as “provisional,” and a student who receives more than one F is rated as “inadequate.” A student rated as “Inadequate” is dismissed; if rated “provisional,” the student may remain but must rise to the status of “adequate” by the end of the following term in order to remain in school.

Incompletes in the Academic Year
The grade of “I” (“Incomplete”) is given when a student fails to complete the work of a course for good reason (the instructor being the judge of what constitutes “good reason”). The instructor must record the grounds for assigning a grade of “I,” specifying a deadline for the work’s completion, and give a copy to the student, to the registrar and the associate dean for academic affairs. If a student believes that she or he will be unable to meet the stated deadline due to grave, extenuating circumstances, the student may request an additional extension from the instructor. In no case can the deadline for completion be later than the end of the midterm break of the following semester, without authorization by the faculty.
If a student fails to submit the work by the deadline, the instructor is to assign a grade of “F” (“zero” if using a 100-point scale for grade calculations) for the missing work and then calculate the final grade for the course.
Unless a student has made prior arrangements with the instructor, a student who is late with work due during a course is dropped one grade fraction immediately (i.e. A to A-), and then a full letter grade for each week (five working days) that the work is late.
The instructor’s policy for work submitted late but before the end of term is to be stated in the course syllabus.

Incompletes in the Summer Session
Work is to be turned in by September 1 each year unless otherwise specified in the syllabus. A grade of “I” (“Incomplete”) is given when a student fails to meet the September 1 deadline. A professor may grant an extension if the student requests it in writing and the professor deems there is good reason for the extension. The professor must document the grounds for granting the extension, specifying a deadline for the work’s completion and any grade penalty to be assessed, and distributing three copies of the statement: one to the registrar, one to the student, and one to the associate dean for academic affairs. A grade of “I” will be entered with the extension deadline. If the work is not turned in by the new deadline, the “I” will be changed to “F.” The extension date may not be later than December 31 of the calendar year, without authorization by the Advanced Degrees committee. The professor’s policy concerning grade penalties for work submitted late is to be stated in the course syllabus if different from the program policy below.
Unless a student has been given an extension by the professor, work turned in after September 1 is dropped one grade fraction immediately (i.e. A to A-). Work received on or after:
October 1 is then dropped a full letter grade (i.e. A- to B-);
November 1 is then dropped another full letter grade;
December 1 is then dropped another full letter grade;
January 1 receives an F.

Grade Appeals
A student who believes that he or she has been assigned a course grade which is unfair or inappropriate, and who has been unable to resolve the matter with the faculty member directly, may appeal to the associate dean for academic affairs. Appeals must be initiated in writing no later than the semester following the one in which the grade in question was given. To act on an appeal, the associate dean must find the complaint has a reasonable basis.  The associate dean informs the faculty member involved of the appeal and requires this faculty member to respond to the student’s claim. 
The concept of academic freedom as practiced at the University prohibits any administrative officer from forcing a faculty member to change a grade. Therefore, an appeal serves more as a form of peer review than an appeal per se. The associate dean may suggest a solution to the dispute, may request that both the faculty member and the student justify their positions, and may recommend policies and procedures to the faculty member.
All faculty members should be aware that they may be asked to justify their personal grading procedures, and should keep adequate records of class performance. In addition, faculty should not request grade changes later than the semester following the one in which the grade in question was given.

Grading Guidelines
Syllabi for all graded courses at The School of Theology will state what percentage of the final course grade each assignment and test earns.

All required courses in the core curriculum are given a letter grade, except when Pass or Fail grading is requested by the instructor and authorized for a particular course by action of the faculty.

All electives are given a letter grade, unless the instructor designates the course as Pass/Fail at the start of the term.
Individual students may request, at the beginning of a particular course, that a letter-graded elective be graded Pass/Fail. An instructor is free to deny the request. If written permission is given, the registrar will change the grading type from letter to pass/fail. A Pass/Fail grade is not included in the GPA nor is it used to qualify for honors.

If Pass/Fail grading is selected by an instructor for a course as a whole, students may not request to be given a letter grade.

Summer courses are given a letter grade. The D.Min. project is graded on a pass/fail basis, while the S.T.M. thesis is given a letter grade.

A student must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 to receive any degree in the Advanced Degrees Program. A student must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.33 to receive any other degree.

Grading Scale
4.0:  A = 100–93 (Exceptional work)
3.7:  A- = 92–90
3.3:  B+ = 89–87 (More than adequate        work)
3.0:  B = 86–83
2.7:  B- =  82–80
2.3:  C+  = 79–77 (Adequate work)
2.0:  C  = 76–73 (Less than adequate)
1.7:  C-  =  72–70
1.3:  D+  =  69–67 (Deficient work)
1.0:  D = 66–63
0.7:  D- =  62–60
0:     F  =  59–00 (Failure to accomplish        task)

Academic Dishonesty
The School expects and requires the highest standards of integrity in academic work as well as in personal and community relationships. Academic dishonesty undermines the very foundation of the enterprise in which we are engaged and threatens to deceive those who will eventually depend on the knowledge and integrity of the men and women who receive their preparation for ministry here. It therefore constitutes unacceptable behavior and conduct.
Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to:
Cheating — the breach of (pre-established) ground rules for completion of assignments, including examinations, by use of resources other than those which have been indicated as permissible. It is assumed that examinations which are designed to test recall of a body of information and the assimilation of that information by a student (“closed book examinations”) do not permit the assistance of written material or assistance from other persons.
Plagiarism — the use of materials without proper acknowledgment of sources and the submission as one’s own ideas, words, and writings of another.
Fabrication — the submission of material which has, in fact, been produced by others or is the result of substantial assistance received from others but not noted as the product of such assistance, or making up false sources.
Duplication — the submission, without prior permission, of portions of the same academic work in fulfillment of requirements for more than one course.
Facilitating academic dishonesty — participation in support of the above named behaviors.
Standards for open book exams are the same as for papers. On closed book exams one reconstructs the best references possible.

Discipline
Persons who are found to have engaged in any form of academic dishonesty will be subject to disciplinary action. If plagiarism, cheating, fabrication or duplication occurs, the student will automatically fail the course in which the incident occurred, and may be dismissed from the School or be subject to other sanctions. Facilitating the academic dishonesty of others will result in the same or similar consequences.


Procedures
1. In order to preserve the integrity of the educational enterprise and to support the vast majority of students who maintain personal integrity in such matters, the faculty will report to the associate dean for academic affairs when dishonesty has occurred.*

2. Because the health of any community is determined not only by the degree to which standards of integrity are maintained by those who hold positions of authority in that community, but also by the degree that all members of the community participate in the maintenance of its standards, it is the expectation that students and faculty who observe or know of an instance of academic dishonesty will report it to the associate dean for academic affairs outlining its specific nature. Such responsibility should, of course, be exercised with due care and should avoid action based on hearsay or rumor.

3. When the associate dean for academic affairs has been presented with such a report, she or he shall make a judgment as to whether it gives sufficient cause to believe that a breach of academic honesty has occurred. If she or he so judges, the associate dean for academic affairs will notify the student that such an allegation has been made and apprise the student of its nature. The student will be given opportunity to present the student’s own interpretation of events related to the allegation and any evidence and/or witnesses to support that interpretation.

4. If, on the basis of such a presentation, it is the judgment of the associate dean for academic affairs there is a likelihood that the allegation is unfounded, the matter will be considered closed with no permanent record in the student’s file. (Administrative records may be kept as necessary.)
a. If the associate dean for academic affairs judges that academic dishonesty has occurred, and the student does not wish to contest the allegation, the student will receive a failing grade for the course. The associate dean for academic affairs will inform the faculty of the incident of academic dishonesty and the resultant failing grade. Any further disciplinary action will be made by the faculty with counsel from the associate dean for academic affairs.
b. During the academic year: If the student does wish to contest the allegation, the associate dean for academic affairs will convene the honor board, consisting of two members of the faculty who serve as advisors, normally including the student’s own advisor, and two students elected by the student body. This board will review the nature of the allegation and its basis. It will also afford the student opportunity to present his or her understanding of the events related to the allegation. If on the basis of that review, it is the opinion of the board that there is a likelihood that the allegation is unfounded, the matter will be considered closed with no permanent record kept in the student’s file. (Administrative records may be kept as necessary.) If on the contrary, the board judges that there is sufficient warrant to believe that an instance of academic dishonesty has occurred, the student will receive a failing grade for the course. The associate dean for academic affairs will inform the faculty of this decision and bring any recommendation for further disciplinary action before the faculty.
During the summer session: If the student does wish to contest the allegation, the associate dean for academic affairs will convene the Advanced Degrees Committee. The Committee will review the nature of the allegation and its basis. It will also afford the student opportunity to present his or her understanding of the events related to the allegation. If on the basis of that review, it is the opinion of the Committee that there is a likelihood that the allegation is unfounded, the matter will be considered closed with no permanent record kept in the student’s file. (Administrative records may be kept as necessary.) If on the contrary, the Committee judges that there is sufficient warrant to believe that an instance of academic dishonesty has occurred, the student will receive a failing grade for the course. The associate dean for academic affairs will inform the faculty of this decision and bring any recommendation for further disciplinary action before the faculty.

5. The student may appeal the judgment to the dean of The School of Theology within 10 days of the decision. The dean will report his decision to the faculty and the Appellant.

6. The student may, in the last resort, appeal the dean’s judgment to the vice-chancellor and president within 10 days of the dean’s decision.

* In the event that the associate dean of academic affairs is the instructor bringing the report, the dean will appoint a senior faculty member to serve in the role designated for the associate dean in procedures outlined in steps 3 through 4.

POLICY AND GROUNDS FOR SUSPENSION OR DISMISSAL

In consultation with the faculty, the dean may suspend or dismiss a student for any of the following reasons:
Academic dishonesty — see above.
Failure of a student to be adequately responsible for academic and/or required co-curricular work.
If the dean and a majority of the faculty determine that they cannot reasonably be expected to recommend a student for ordination (M.Div. or D.A.S. or S.T.M./Anglican Studies).
Inappropriate behavior that the dean and a majority of the faculty determine to be disruptive or destructive of the learning process and/or community life.
Charged with a civil or criminal offense or a breach of morality, if in the judgment of the dean, this precludes effective membership in the student body, causes disruption of the life of The School of Theology, or creates a reasonable doubt of the student’s suitability for ministry in the church.
The decision of which sanctions to apply rests with the dean in consultation with the faculty. Dismissal normally precludes readmission. In the case of suspension, the determination of the term and circumstances of suspension and conditions for readmission rests with the dean in consultation with the faculty. If the dean judges that action must be taken before there is adequate time to consult the faculty, the dean may do so.
Dismissal automatically terminates any contract between the school and the student. For information concerning refunds of tuition, see the section on financial information.


POLICY REGARDING WITHDRAWAL

A student may request to withdraw from The School of Theology by submitting the request in writing to the dean of The School of Theology. The letter should describe in detail the reasons for the request. If medical conditions cause or contribute to the request, they must be documented by a professional in the field (physician, therapist, etc.). Withdrawal is granted only upon approval by the dean. The dean may impose conditions for readmission, and readmission is not guaranteed.
A student in good standing who timely completes the requirements of an academic term may be granted a leave of absence starting with the next term for a maximum leave of two years. Students who wish to reenroll following a leave of absence may, in the dean’s discretion, be readmitted within two years without repeating the complete process of admission.
A student in good standing may request to withdraw during an academic term by submitting a written request to the dean describing in detail the reasons for the request. If the withdrawal is granted, normally the grades of W or WF will be assigned for each current course, depending on the student’s work in that course up to the time of withdrawal. At the dean’s discretion, the student may be readmitted within one year without completing the full process of admission. A letter to the dean explaining how the circumstances leading to the withdrawal have been resolved is always required for readmission, and the dean may impose further conditions for readmission.
A student not in good standing may be allowed to withdraw during or at the end of a term by submitting a written request to the dean describing in detail the reasons for the request. If the withdrawal is granted, normally the grades of W or WF will be assigned for each current course, depending on the student’s work in that course up to the time of withdrawal. At the dean’s discretion, the student may be permitted to apply for readmission, but the whole process of application must be repeated.

Definition of “Good Standing”
M.Div./M.A./D.A.S./C.T.S.
A student is in good standing if his or her grade point average is 2.33 or higher, the student has not been rated “provisional” or “inadequate” due to failure of a course or a grade point average below 2.33 in the prior semester, and if no disciplinary action has been taken or is impending.
D.Min./S.T.M.
A student is in good standing if his or her grade point average is 3.0 or higher, the student has not been rated “provisional” or “inadequate” due to failure of a course or a grade point average below 3.0 in the prior term, and if no disciplinary action has been taken or is impending.

RELEASE OF STUDENT INFORMATION

The official and final repository of the permanent academic records relating to students is maintained in the University Registrar’s Office. Information relating to courses and grades is kept there and is summarized on the students’ transcripts.
Requests for transcripts must be submitted in writing to the University Registrar’s Office. There is no charge for the official transcript. However, there is a fee for next day delivery. The request form may be found at registrar.sewanee.edu/downloads/forms/Transcript_Request_Form.pdf
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights include:
The right to inspect and review the student’s education records (providing they have not waived this right) within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access. Students should submit to the University Registrar or other appropriate official, written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The University official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the University official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate. Students may ask the University to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate. They should write to the University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate. If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.
The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University; a person serving on financial aid committees; a person or company with whom the University has contracted; a person serving on the Board of Trustees or Board of Regents; or a student serving on an official committee. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.
The University designates the following categories of personally identifiable student information as public or “Directory Information.” The University may disclose or publish such information at its discretion: student’s full name; current enrollment status; local address and telephone number; permanent address and telephone number; temporary address and telephone number; electronic mail addresses; parents’ names, addresses, and telephone numbers; date and place of birth; dates of attendance; class standing (e.g. middler); schedule of classes; previous educational institution(s) attended; field(s) of study; awards and honors; degree(s) conferred (including dates of conferral); full-time or part-time status; photographic or videotaped images of the student; past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities; and height and weight of student athletes.
Currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of directory information by submitting written notification on an annual basis (usually prior to the beginning of the Advent semester) to the University Registrar’s Office at: The University of the South, 735 University Avenue, Sewanee, Tennessee 37383-1000. Directory information will then be withheld until the student releases the hold on disclosure or until the end of the current academic year, whichever comes first. Students should understand that, by withholding directory information, some information considered important to students may not reach them.
The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by State University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is:
Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-5901
The FERPA website is www.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html
The University of the South’s complete Education Records and FERPA Policy are at registrar.sewanee.edu/students/policies/

EVALUATION AND DISCLOSURE OF PERSONAL QUALIFICATIONS

As a seminary of the Episcopal Church, The School of Theology is required by canon law to evaluate postulants and candidates for Holy Orders with regard to their academic performance, their professional competence, and their personal qualifications to exercise the ordained ministry of the Episcopal Church.
Evaluation includes the student’s participation in the entire curriculum (i.e., lectures, seminars, and liturgical life) and also in the life of the seminary community. It includes several kinds of reporting: grades, oral statements, and written evaluations.
These students sign a release each year giving The School of Theology permission to disclose this information to diocesan officials. The written information consists of, but is not limited to, a final transcript each May, the middler evaluation in February of the middler year, and the senior recommendation for ordination in February of the senior year.

ASSISTANCE FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

The University of the South is committed to fostering respect for the diversity of The School of Theology community and the individual rights of each member of that community. In this spirit, and in accordance with the provisions of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the University seeks to provide disabled students with the reasonable accommodations needed to ensure equal access to the programs and activities of the School of Theology.  While the School of Theology provides services to support the academic work of all its students, additional accommodations can be made specifically for students with learning disabilities (LD), attention deficit hyper
activity disorder (ADHD), or other properly diagnosed and documented disabilities covered by these Acts.

Learning Disabilities
Verification services for students with LD/ADHD at Sewanee are coordinated through the University Counseling Service (931.598.1325) located at 1310 University Avenue, next to Emerald-Hodgson Hospital.  A counseling service psychologist talks with individual students to determine specific needs and to identify appropriate accommodations and resources, and recommended modifications.  All incoming students with previously diagnosed LD/ADHD are encouraged to make an appointment with the Associate Dean for Community Life as early as possible in their seminary career.  They will be subsequently advised to provide copies of relevant documentation to the University Counselor and to meet with a counseling service psychologist. Documentation must include an evaluation that covers the criteria for and establishes the diagnosis of the condition in question and must be reviewed for approval by the University Counselor.  Any student who suspects he or she may have an undiagnosed learning disability or attention deficit or is uncertain about a previous diagnosis is welcome to consult with Associate Dean for Community Life, who will then refer them to the staff of the University Counseling Service consultation and subsequent evaluation as necessary. Students with LD/ADHD, as determined and/or confirmed by the University Counseling Service, are expected to discuss arrangements that might be necessary with their professors at the beginning of each semester.
 
Assistance for the Medically Disabled
Students seeking assistance based upon a medical disability must submit appropriate diagnostic documentation related to the disability to and meet with the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. After review of submitted materials, decisions will be made about accommodations, if appropriate, in consultation with the faculty.

Access for the Physically Disabled
The location of some campus facilities may be inaccessible to some disabled students. These students should check with the office of the Associate Dean of Community Life to obtain help in dealing with specific needs related to those facilities.

Students needing help with other disabilities should contact the Associate Dean of Community Life and the University Health Services office at 931.598.1270.  More information regarding assistance for the disabled is available on the University’s website www2.sewanee.edu/catalog_student_life/assistance_for_the-disabled.
The School of Theology provides access to limited-time professional counseling services for students and their family members seeking assistance with various concerns—academic, social, emotional or interpersonal. Discussions between students or family members and their health or service providers are confidential and information cannot be disclosed except in rare situations as required by law, or at the student’s request. This includes not disclosing health information to University officials or dioceses. Inquiries should be directed to the Office of Community Life, located in Hamilton Hall, 931.598.1655.

INCLUSIVE LANGUAGE

It is the policy of The School of Theology that the standard of written and spoken language used by students and faculty when referring to contemporary humanity shall be gender inclusive and that it shall avoid perpetuation of derogatory religious, racial, and national stereotypes. Efforts should be made to include the full range of biblical imagery when referring to God, if appropriate, in consultation with the assistant dean for community life.

NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY

The University of the South’s policy against discrimination, harassment, sexual misconduct, and retaliation is consistent with Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 34 CFR Part 106, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and 34 CFR 104.7, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, and the Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act of 2008. In addition to contacting the Associate Provost for Planning and Administration, who is the compliance coordinator, persons with inquiries regarding the application of Title IX and 34 CFR Part 106 may contact the Regional Civil Rights Director, U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, Region IV, 61 Forsyth Street S.W., Suite 19T70, Atlanta, Georgia 30303.

University Media Relations Policy

Objectives:
to ensure consistency in communications with news media from across the University;
to help maintain the high level of credibility the University enjoys in its dealings with the media; and
to protect the reputation of the University, its students and employees.

Rationale:
Stories about people and projects in the news media can illuminate the University’s educational mission, advancing communications strategies designed to raise awareness by the public of the intellectual and cultural resources on campus and of opportunities to be engaged in the life of the University. The news media also are important conduits of news and information during crisis and emergencies. The University values its relationships with the news media and recognizes the value of engaging reporters, editors, broadcasters, and internet content providers in communicating about the University to mass audiences.

The Office of Marketing and Communications is the chief point of contact between the University and the news media, and may be reached at ext. 1734. Through its media relations services, the Office seeks to serve the University’s purpose statement by providing honest, timely and useful information to all its internal and external stakeholders and audiences, and by helping the university understand, anticipate, and manage its environment.

Implementation:
The Office of Marketing and Communications assists journalists with inquiries about the University and provides counsel to faculty, staff, and students in managing and working with the news media. All inquiries from the media should as a matter of course be directed or reported to Marketing and Communications. In most cases, the Office will recommend a spokesperson to speak on behalf of specific issues or news. For example, subject to their availability and interest, faculty members may be asked to serve as expert sources for news stories relating to the faculty member’s academic area of expertise.

In some cases, typically crises and other sensitive issues, the Executive Director of Marketing and Communications, or his/her designee, serves as the University spokesperson and is responsible for speaking on behalf of the University.

Likewise, all outreach to the news media in the form of press releases, press advisories, pitch letters and other vehicles shall be managed by the Office of Marketing and Communications
 

Academic Resources | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Academic Resources

The Jesse Ball duPont Library

The duPont Library is a component of the University’s Information Technology Services division that provides the members of the academic community with access to resources that support the current and anticipated instructional, research, and service programs of the University of the South.

Since the early 1980s, duPont Library has housed all Library collections and services for the School of Theology as well as the College of Arts and Sciences. All materials and services in duPont Library are equally available to students and faculty in both the College and the School of Theology. A Theology Reference area is maintained on the third floor of duPont, staffed during regular business hours (8 am- 5 pm M-F).

Circulating materials in philosophy, psychology, and religion--with call numbers in Library of Congress B-BX or Dewey 100-299--are shelved on the third floor. In addition, there are a number of non-circulating materials: (a) reserves for School of Theology courses, available on a self-serve basis; (b) the Theology Reference collection; (c) Theology Periodicals, shelved alphabetically by title; (d) Theology Special Collections, accessible on request to a Theology librarian. Christian education materials and Theology Media are also located here.
There are also several Library Catalog terminals and a photocopier on the third floor, as well as a good deal of open seating.

Hamilton Hall Reading Room

Room 111 in Hamilton Hall is available as a reading room for students at The School of Theology. It contains a small reference collection, duplicates of some reserve materials for courses, and sets of both the Sewanee Theological Review and Anglican Theological Review. Other materials are added from time to time. The room offers a variety of seating, ample power outlets, wireless access, and a quiet atmosphere for study. Every theology student is given a key to the room, which is kept locked when unoccupied in order to preserve access and security. The librarian of The School of Theology is in charge of the reading room.

The reading room is intended to provide a quiet place for study within the classroom building, where students spend much of each weekday during term. Since the library is some distance away, it is impractical to use during the relatively short gaps in the daily academic schedule. The reading room makes it possible to use such short amounts of time more efficiently.

Kaleidoscope Institute

The Rev. Eric H. F. Law founded the Kaleidoscope Institute to continue the ministry that he started back in the late 1980s when he began a theological and practical journey through the landscape of diversity. His focus has always been: as a Christian, how can he follow Christ’s call to seek and serve Christ in every person and respect the dignity of every human being? What started out as a need to help himself, and others around him, address race and diversity issues in faithful and constructive ways has evolved into something much bigger and deeper. Over the years, many have found his writing and workshops helpful for their ministries. He has written six books on the subject, ranging from individual spiritual practice to systemic transformational applications. His first book, The Wolf Shall Dwell with the Lamb, also appeared in a Spanish translation in 2005.

Episcopal Preaching Foundation/Preaching Excellence Program

The Episcopal Preaching Foundation (EPF), founded more than a quarter-century ago as the Episcopal Evangelism Foundation, Inc., works to improve and enhance the quality of preaching in the Episcopal Church. During its history of service to the Church, the EPF has sought to fulfill its mission in a variety of ways, but at the heart of its work has been the annual Preaching Excellence Program (PEP) for Episcopal seminarians. Each year 60 to 70 students from Episcopal and other seminaries gather at a central location for a week of preaching, worship, workshops, lectures, and fellowship under the leadership of the EPF director, Episcopal seminary faculty members, and guest speakers. More than one thousand priests and deacons of the Episcopal Church, including the Most Reverend Katharine Jefferts Schori, Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, are PEP alums.

Kanuga Conferences

Affiliated with the Episcopal Church since 1928, Kanuga Conferences is situated on 1,400 mountain acres near Hendersonville, North Carolina, with scenic Kanuga Lake at its center. From vestry conferences to youth events to liturgical arts, Kanuga-sponsored conferences provide education, renewal and refreshment to more than 3,000 guests each year covering a broad range of subjects.

Vanderbilt and Sewanee Partnership

In a collaborative effort to expand the resources available to our students, The School of Theology has partnered with Vanderbilt Divinity School. This partnership includes opportunities for faculty exchange as well as shared course offerings. Students are eligible to take courses at both Vanderbilt and Sewanee at the tuition rate of their home institution, with all credit applying toward their degree program of enrollment.

About Vanderbilt Divinity School

The Divinity School began in 1875, following the 1873 founding of the University. It was established as the biblical department of Vanderbilt University and from its opening until May 1914 was under the auspices of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Since that date it has carried on its work as an ecumenical theological school under direction of the Vanderbilt University Board of Trust.

In 1915, by Board of Trust action, the biblical department became the Divinity School, with its own dean and faculty. For more than a century the school has graduated many hundreds of men and women who have carried on their ministries in all parts of this country and throughout the world.

The Divinity School offers two primary degrees: the master of divinity (M.Div.) and the master of theological studies (M.T.S.). The master of arts (M.A.) and doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) are offered through the graduate department of religion. For more information on both degrees, click here.

How to Enroll

Interested in taking a course at The Vanderbilt Divinity School? Currently enrolled Sewanee students should indicate their interest to their academic advisor to discuss the planned curriculum. Registration must be also approved by the office of the associate dean for academic affairs at The School of Theology.

Student Exchange Program

The School of Theology has entered into a student exchange partnership with Westcott House, Cambridge, U.K. These two historic seminaries, both established in the 1800’s, have created a program for seminarians to experience prayer, study, and community life abroad in their middler year. The program takes place during the advent semester in Sewanee and the fall term in Cambridge.

The Rev. Dr. Benjamin King, assistant professor of Church history, and the Rev. Dr. James Turrell, associate dean for academic affairs, both of The School of Theology, felt that an integral part of a seminary education is the ability to experience Anglicanism in its many traditions. Looking to the Church’s English heritage, and with the benefit of an existing academic relationship, Westcott House was a great place to start.

Westcott House is dedicated to “pastorally and liturgically growing in compassion, creativity, and imagination to live the Gospel in every place to which God calls us.” The School of Theology shares in this formational process developing “leaders who are learned, skilled, informed by the Word of God, and committed to the mission of the church, in the Anglican tradition of forming disciples through a common life of prayer, learning, and service.” The two schools share a sense of mission to prepare clergy for service in the parish and beyond. That formed the basis for a conversation that quickly became a course of action.

Interested parties should contact the office of the dean for academic affairs.

Continuing Education | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Continuing Education

Lectures

The School of Theology hosts a year-round series of lectures. A complete list of upcoming lectures may be found here.

Lectures at The School of Theology are made possible by these funds:
• In the spring, the Beattie and Arrington Lectures are given in alternate years and usually focus on more scholarly topics.
• The Arrington Lectures have been funded by Cornelia G. C. Arrington as "a Thank Offering for four John White Arringtons."
• The Bayard Hale Jones Memorial Lectureship in Liturgics was established by Emily S. Jones.
• The Belford Lecture has been endowed in honor of the Rev. Dr. Lee Archer Belford, on topics in Christian/Jewish relations.

The DuBose Lectures are held in the fall. Endowed by an initial gift from the Rev. Jack C. Graves and substantially increased by a gift from Miss Margaret (Peggy) A. Chisholm of Laurel, Miss., and New York City, the lectures memorialize William Porcher DuBose, second dean of The School of Theology. These lectures, along with continuing education workshops, focus annually on a topic of wide appeal in the church.

Videos of many of our past lectures may be viewed here.

Workshops

The DuBose lectures offer continuing education workshops preceeding the lectures. The schedule and descriptions for the next workshops will be available in August, 2013.

The annual church marketing workshop is held in the spring. The 2012 workshop featured the Rev. Jake Dell, senior manager of digital marketing and advertising in the Episcopal Church's Office of Communication.

The 2013 church marketing workshop featured the Rev. Furman Buchanan and Randall Curtis. It focused on traditional church marketing, social media, and website content management.

Materials from these workshop are available here.

In-residence Programs

The School of Theology offers both a bishop-in-residence program and a fellow-in-residence program. Full details are available here.

Academic Calendars | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South
Contextual Education | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Contextual Education

The contextual education program at The School of Theology provides an avenue for dialogue between the heritage and disciplines of faith and the congregations and people served.

In the program, students apply classroom education and theory to a particular ministry context and then reflect on that experience in the classroom, in colloquy groups, and in on-site meetings with a trained clergy mentor.

Learning occurs most effectively within a systemically balanced program of study, action, and reflection. This balance is a critical part of the formation of clergy as a “wholesome example” to the people of God. The education harvested here will set a pattern for a balanced and faithful commitment to prayer, study, and action in the student’s future life and ministry.

There are five components to contextual education.

Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE)
Clinical Pastoral Education provides professional education for ministry by bringing theological students into supervised encounter with persons in crisis. Out of this intense involvement with persons in need, and feedback from peers and teachers, students develop new awareness of themselves as persons and of the needs of those to whom they minister.

Theory and Practice of Ministry Courses
Contextual education I and II plenary classes and colloquy groups provide an opportunity to put theory into practice and be used as the foundation for field education. Students read and discuss writings on congregational models and dynamics systems, theories and models in developing multicultural congregations and social justice ministries.

Field Education
Field education provides a safe and accountable practice field for the student to learn and exercise skills of ordained leadership at an accredited field education site under the direction of a certified clergy mentor. The profiles for field education sites are far ranging in number, size, diversity, and within commuting distance of the School.

Immersion
A student may choose to fulfill part of the field education requirement by participating in
a summer residential immersion experience of eight to 10 weeks in his or her sponsoring diocese or in another approved location.

Cross-Cultural Field Education
Cross-cultural field education helps students begin to reflect on their ministry in a post Christendom era by seeing the world and their racial, religious, and social group from another culture’s perspective.

Resources
Contextual Education Manual 2013–2014
Field Education Directory 2013–2014

News From the Field

Easter 2014 Clergy Mentor Letter

 

Academics | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Academics

The School of Theology is proud of its outstanding and highly credentialed faculty and a structured and academically challenging curriculum — all grounded in the Gospel of Jesus Christ. 

Degrees & Programs | The School of Theology | Sewanee: The University of the South

Degrees & Programs

Master of Divinity (M.Div.)

The Master of Divinity curriculum of The School of Theology is designed to provide students with the spiritual formation, knowledge, and skills required to become committed, effective ordained clergy. Throughout the three years students have an opportunity to explore their pastoral vocation and to be formed in Christ’s own priesthood given to the church and expressed in a variety of ministries. To this end there is study of Scripture, tradition, and culture, with a view to the reasoned practice of the ministry of Word and Sacrament in both its historical context and its contemporary setting.

Master of Arts (M.A.)

The Master of Arts program of The School of Theology is designed as a general academic degree for people who wish to begin advanced study of theological disciplines in a church-related setting. It is a research degree and involves a two-year course of study. A research paper is required. Advanced standing may be granted to those who come with previous work in the theological disciplines. It also may be the appropriate degree for some ordained American and international students with previous theological study. On its own, this degree does not satisfy the canonical requirements for ordination. A second general track will lead students through the classical theological disciplines and does not require a research paper.

Anglican Studies Program (D.A.S.)

Anglican Studies is a special program that examines Anglican theology, history, spirituality, liturgy, preaching, and polity. This program is designed primarily for those who already have a divinity degree and have transferred from the ministry of other communions to ministry in the Episcopal Church. Students are introduced to the Anglican ethos through study of the common heritage and present identity of churches comprising the Anglican Communion, and through study of the development of Anglicanism.

Certificate of Theological Studies (C.T.S.)

The Certificate of Theological Studies is designed for students who wish to pursue graduate theological education without earning a degree. The program is especially appropriate for persons who want some structured theological education, but are unable to enroll in a degree program. The Certificate of Theological Studies program is shaped to meet the needs of the individual student.

Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.)

Participants will attain excellence in the practice of ministry by developing further the attitudes, skills, and knowledge essential to their ministry. The D.Min. program stresses the relationship between the practice of ministry and biblical, historical and theological knowledge. The D.Min. program is not intended to prepare persons for graduate teaching and is part of the School's Advanced Degrees Program.

Doctor of Ministry in Preaching (D.Min)

The D.Min. in Preaching degree is the only such degree based at an Episcopal seminary, and is offered in response to a growing need for post-M.Div. study, instruction, and critical practice in preaching. No more than eight students will be accepted into the D.Min. in Preaching degree track each year, in order to assure adequate support for their course study and thesis project. This degree is part of the School's Advanced Degrees Program.

Doctor of Ministry in Liturgy (D.Min.)

The Advanced Degree Program of The School of Theology, offers a track in the Doctor of Ministry degree program in Liturgy. No more than 10 students will be accepted into the D.Min. in Liturgy degree track each year in order to assure adequate support for their course of study and thesis/project. This degree is part of the School's Advanced Degrees Program.

Masters of Sacred Theology (S.T.M.)

Gain further mastery in a chosen area of theological study. Students will attain and apply the skills needed for scholarly research in a theological discipline at an advanced level. The S.T.M. program is intended for those who may wish to prepare for graduate study at the doctoral level, for various forms of teaching, for the scholarly enhancement of ministerial practice, or for disciplined reflection in an area of ministry. The S.T.M. and the S.T.M./A.S. are part of the School's Advanced Degrees Program.

Masters of Sacred Theology in Anglican Studies (S.T.M./A.S.)

As above, but with a concentration in Anglican Studies.

Certificate in Christian Spirituality

Students already enrolled in a degree program may earn a certificate in Christian spirituality by completing coursework and reflecting on experiential learning in the area of spirituality.